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How does the "Elemental Equilibrium" passive skill work?

For how long is the change in resistance applied to the enemy? How does it affect enemies when you hit them with multiple elements at the same time? Does the penalty stack or stay at 50%)? Also in the case of multiple simultaneous elements, which element is considered "first" to hit? Is "Chaos" damage considered elemental? Does it apply to spells as well as melee and ranged attacks?

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1 Answer 1

First off, it applies to all elemental damage whether it's from a spell or attack. The penalties/bonuses do not stack with multiple hits. Chaos is not an element, fire, ice, and lightning are the only elements. The way multiple elements at once work is that the penalty is applied to all the elements you hit with on the previous attack, and the bonus to the ones you didn't hit with on the previous attack. So if you hit with both fire and ice, on your next attack fire and ice will BOTH have penalties, but lightning will get a bonus. If you hit with one just one element, only it gets penalized, while the other two both get bonuses. If you hit with all three, all three will be penalized on your next attack.

The penalties and bonuses last for 5 seconds, or until they are overwritten with a new elemental equilibrium strike (ref). When soloing each of your hits will reset the resists/bonuses based on what you hit with.

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Thank you! :) May I add to the question what happens if you don't hit the enemy for an extended period of time? does the penalty last forever then? Also, I assume it activates with "passive" damage sources like "Tempest Shield"? –  Taxable Feb 12 '13 at 9:45
    
Also, how does it interact with minions and their attacks, and explosions from Minion Instability? Finally, does it take effect when allies/minions deal damage through your auras? (didn't edit in time) –  Taxable Feb 12 '13 at 9:57

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