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I am having issues with large amounts of traffic being backed up coming into my city. I already have 2 Bus Terminals running 13,000-15,000 Sims per day fully capped out on buses with a wait time of about an hour still for them.

I also am utilizing my train stations with about 1,000 Sims using those per day. I also have street cars on all of my avenues which 40,000+ Sims are using those on a day to day basis with an average wait time of 40-45 minutes.

image

My city only has a population that fluxes between 90-100k at the moment but this incoming traffic problem seems to really hit me hard. Any ideas? Above is my incoming highway.

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Don't have the game yet, so I'll leave real answers for others: But first thing coming to my mind looking at that screenshot: Why don't you connect the two roads and the Highway right at the border of the map? Is this not possible? Or do you want to force them to the terminal? Because I'd assume this would allow the traffic to split immediately, not only all the way in. –  Mario Mar 9 '13 at 9:50
    
@Mario between the square and the border, that is pre-existing road. Only the end of it can be extended or intersected - the rest may not be intersected or modified. If it was modifyable, I'm sure it would have been upgraded to streetcar avenue as well. –  David B Mar 9 '13 at 16:36
    
Ah okay, thought you could modify any part of it inside the city borders. –  Mario Mar 9 '13 at 17:30
    
I actually can connect those two roads, but that actually causes more traffic problems because then everyone tries to filter through a smaller road instead of my high density avenue –  user1723137 Mar 9 '13 at 17:58

2 Answers 2

up vote 11 down vote accepted

You have a problem with people turning left at that first intersection. If everyone turns the same way, it effectively turns the road into a single lane road. Address this by making sure that people who turn right and go straight can still reach destinations on the left. Cars do not always take the shortest route, so some will take the alternate routes.

Do you see that square at the entrance? That's a conversion intersection between a heavy avenue and a streetcar avenue. Making a streetcar avenue at that point is useless - people aren't just going to jump out of their cars and ride it. Since you can't upgrade the entrance road to streetcar avenue, downgrade the road between the conversion intersection and your first turning intersection to heavy avenue.

Add destinations that incoming sims will want before the first turning intersection.


I landed in a similar situation in my game today. Here's a shot of the commuters. It's a nice mix of workers and shoppers which have founded a bumper-to-bumper parking lot outside my city. 9pm? That's not a rush hour, it's a way of life.

entrance traffic woes

Everyone is turning right at the first intersection. I tried various things to solve it. Reducing the number of commuters. Adding a commuter train. Adding 48 commuter buses (at ~5000 simolean monthly cost). Nothing stuck, so I removed those buses and made the roads "worse". Here's a shot of the solution, along with a nice long column of flowing traffic. It's 8 o'clock and I don't know where the traffic went.

entrance traffic solved

The fix addressed two issues.

Cars were turning right at that first intersection and immediately getting hit with another stoplight. Throughput was limited by the synchronization of those stoplights. In my fix, there are a few 2-way intersections after that right turn. 2-way intersections (and conversion intersections) have no stop mechanism: cars just flow through. That driver may turn right, but it will be a long time before he hits another stopping mechanism.

But that's not enough. By itself this would just move the problem to the end of that long street. I moved the right turn forward, and made cars have to drive back to reach places near the entrance. Cars also would enjoy a shorter trip to places in the back of the city if they just would go straight through that first intersection. This had the affect of dividing the traffic. In that first intersection, get 3/4 of the traffic to go straight (using three lanes!) and 1/4 to turn (using one lane).

Breaking the grid this way made the drivers do what I want, even though they could have done it themselves. Now, they have a longer commute, but less time spend parking during it.

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Last night, I observed an intersection that was not right angles allowing more than one lane to turn. –  David B Mar 12 '13 at 12:27

In my largest city, at 244,000, the first intersection is about half of the way in and is a three way going to the right. Streetcar Avenues. My next is about three quarters of the way down. Another three way, this time to the left. After that I let high capacity streets cross. I use buses and streetcars. I am careful about placing anything on the Avenues. I use Streetcar Avenues as feeders. Then I use dead ends and loops to carry traffic to the avenues. I have two trade centers two recycling centers, three elementary schools and a University. And I no longer use regional buses. Traffic is heavy at the first intersection in prime time but does back out of the city and the cross city traffic, school buses and trash and recycling plus city services can get through with no problems. I can't post an image you can try this link to Google+. https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-JTddYs1PEQY/UUid-vnU4PI/AAAAAAAABJk/1qHfgywa6u0/w497-h373/Spark_2013-03-19_12-43-37.jpg. I've never tried this.

edit it appears to be a little small. I'll substitute a larger one when I can.

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