Take the 2-minute tour ×
Arqade is a question and answer site for passionate videogamers on all platforms. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a Peat Bog and Turbary and I powered it using a fuel-powered Combustion Engine cooled with an Aqueous Accumulator, but I still wound up with a giant crater. What happened?

share|improve this question
add comment

3 Answers

Basically, what happens is that the Peat Bog and Turbary don't need the incredible amount of power produced and it goes back in the Combustion Engine. This causes it to overheat no matter how much coolant you have in the engine. One of the perks of using Redstone Energy Conduits from Thermal Expansion is that they will automatically dissipate unused MJ out of the pipe instead of ejecting it back into the engine. But, for low energy machines in the early game, you should most likely use Peat-Fired Engines once you get peat going (you could manually farm it if you need to).

share|improve this answer
    
Pump excess energies into a quarry. A quarry has a max input of 500 MJ/t. Try producing that much! –  Jeffrey Lin May 5 '13 at 1:52
    
Could one also use Redstone Energy Cells and/or other machines with high levels of power consumption? –  crayzeedude May 2 at 18:06
    
@crayzeedude - It should be possible, but I haven't tested whether a Redstone Energy Cell will backup power if it's full. –  Nathan2055 May 5 at 17:47
add comment

a few reasons for this:

  • Chunks unload/reload/etc (this will cause your water source to disappear when pumped)
  • Not enough work for the engine causes heat to rise very fast, if you arent pumping enough water, or if previous problem happens. kaboom.
  • lag can cause the tick calculation to go a little bit wonky and the engine heat will just spike, and kaboom.

solutions, use weaker engines or a different power source (electrical engines never explode)

as mentioned in the other answer, Thermal expansion is probably your best source when using Buildcraft energy is redstone energy conduits/cells.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Excess energy goes back into the combustion engine which then overheats the combustion engine and bam!

I usually just use an electrical engine to solve this, since it has good mj/tick and doesn't explode

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.