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I've played Skyrim through several times (as a good guy and a bad guy) and while I'm waiting for the next game, I decided to play Oblivion. I'm really impressed with the continuity between the two games. But one thing is really bugging me; in Skyrim, Peryite is the Daedic prince of order and tasks, however in the Shivering Isles expansion of Oblivion, Jyggalag is the Daedric prince of order. What's up with that?

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If you have this question, just keep playing, all will be revealed. –  uncle brad Jul 23 '13 at 23:00
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@OrigamiRobot I think it's better to leave [oblivion] in the question. I believe Jyggalag only appeared in TES IV: Oblivion, and does not appear and isn't mentioned in the other TES games. –  galacticninja Oct 11 '13 at 14:54

4 Answers 4

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In Jyggalag's case, I think that "order" refers to logical deduction and determinism. This is not unreasonable considering that his Great Library contained formulae that allowed him to predict all events before it happened.

According to the Librarian, Dyus:

The great library was the height of logic and deduction. Contained within its walls were the logical prediction of every action ever taken by any creature, mortal or Daedric. Every birth. Every death. The rise of Tiber Septim. The Numidium. Everything. All predicted with the formulae found within Jyggalag's library.

When the jealous Daedra cursed Jyggalag to live in opposition to all he stood for, they made him the Prince of Madness which is the opposite of logical deduction. In Shivering Isles, Dyus mentions that Sheogorath burned the library because it was the anti-thesis of his new beliefs in personal choice:

When Sheogorath discovered the library he had it burned, insisting that it was an abomination and that personal choice defied logical prediction.

Thus, I think that the Lore strongly suggests that Jyggalag is the Daedra of Order in the sense of Logical Deduction and determinism.

Regarding Peryite, there are two main in-game sources of information on the Daedra:

Firstly, we have On Oblivion by Morias Zenon

...Molag Bal elects the employment of other daedra, and Boethiah inspires the arms of mortal warriors. Peryite's sphere seems to be pestilence, and Vaernima's torture.

In preparation for the next instalment [sic] in this series, I will be investigating two matters that have intrigued me since I began my career as a Daedra researcher. ...

Secondly we have The Book of Daedra

Peryite, whose sphere is the ordering of the lowest orders of Oblivion, known as the Taskmaster.

Neither of them indicate that he's a Daedra of "Order" or that "Order" is part of his sphere. Rather The Book of Daedra makes him sound more like a foreman and is quick to elaborate that whatever ordering Peryite does is more akin to that of a "Taskmaster".

Notice that in the original text, they add emphasis to the fact that he's a "Taskmaster" by capitalizing the word, but do not do the same for "ordering". This is done to illustrate what his main function is and how he's different from Jyggalag.

Thus, even if we choose to believe that Peryite is a Daedra of Order, it seems clear to me that his sphere of "Order" is distinct from that of Jyggalag's.

Of course, if this is still unacceptable, we could take the cop-out route and simply claim that Peryite took over his Lord of Order position after he became the Prince of Madness! Since Jyggalag was cursed before recorded history, this explanation isn't contradicted by any in-game manuscripts.

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Nice use of primary sources! Seems the wikis aren't quite accurate. –  SevenSidedDie Oct 11 '13 at 14:42

I think there is some confusion here. With so many Princes it is sometimes easy to forget.

Peryite, also known as the Taskmaster, is the Daedric Prince whose spheres are order and pestilence.

Whereas Jyggalag is the Daedric Prince of Order.

Source 1 : Peryite

Source 2 : Jyggalag

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That... really doesn't clear it up. Even after reading those links (and more), I'm still with the asker on this one: how can they be Daedric Princes whose domains are both order? –  SevenSidedDie Jul 18 '13 at 4:30
    
@SevenSidedDie I am with you on this one as well. Maybe the developers missed something and ended up with this. –  ヴァイシャリ Jul 18 '13 at 6:44
    
@One-One I thought that they missed something too, except that the continuity is so "tight" everywhere else. –  uncle brad Jul 25 '13 at 19:10
    
Reading the lore, is it possible that Peryite gained the spehere of order when Jyggalag was stuck in the cycle of destruction with Sheogorath? As otherwise there would only be a Daedra of Order for short periods, once per era. –  Michael Campbell Oct 6 '13 at 21:50

Peryite is more of the "balance/equality in the universe" type of Order. Jyggalag is more of the straight-lines, grey, "boring" type of Order

Source

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Although I agree, I can't get behind an answer that's based on a bunch of fans shooting the breeze. There's nothing official about that source. –  SevenSidedDie Jul 23 '13 at 0:37
    
@SevenSidedDie - true, that source is hardly cannon, but from playing the game you get the idea that Jyggalag represents a kind-of mindless order, like entropy. –  uncle brad Jul 25 '13 at 19:15
    
@unclebrad True. That doesn't make sourcing fan speculation into a good answer, though. Your own explanation from personal impression is better quality than passing off some random wiki chatter as a [Source] is! ;) –  SevenSidedDie Jul 25 '13 at 20:25

From what I understand(and I unfortunately have no sources for this; this is merely conjecture) Peryite is more or less Order in the form of Bureaucracy; he manages the lesser planes of Oblivion.

Jyggalag is ruler of the PLANE of Order. His whole being is dedicated to Order in and of itself, while Peryite simply uses Order as a management tool, trying to make Order from the Chaos that must stem from managing numerous planes of Oblivion.

Hope this at least gives another perspective. ^_^

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