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I was playing Halo 4 multiplayer with some friends last night and I noticed that certain players were harder to kill than others. After one has killstreaks do you become easier to kill or does the difficulty to kill players change?

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The only thing that significantly changes how hard an opponent is to kill is the Overshield which can sometimes be earned through Ordinance Drops. However, Overshields are somewhat rare and the effect is obvious - the player glows bright green.

Imprecise weapons like the assault rifle will do less damage at range owing to the bullet spread. Obviously, the further the target is away, the more likely you are to miss with any weapon. Vehicles can offer some level of protection just due to their size and its effect on absorbing some shots. However, you can still kill a person with the same number of shots, if you hit the person riding in the vehicle rather than the vehicle itself.

Other than that, everyone has the same health/shields and goes down in the same number of shots from weapon fire.

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thank you; are there games where there is a disability given to advanced players? –  caseyr547 Apr 29 at 15:14
    
@caseyr547, not that I'm aware of. There are game modes like SWAT where nobody has shields, but there aren't any game types where the lower level players are given advantages, as far as I know –  agent86 Apr 29 at 15:15
    
so xp doesnt make it easier for higher level characters to kill lower level characters? –  caseyr547 Apr 29 at 15:26
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@caseyr547, not really, no. If you and an opponent have the same weapon but you're level 1 and they're level 50, you'll do the same damage to each other per-hit and you have the same health. There are more loadout choices (ie, weapons, tactical abilities, etc) at the higher levels. They're supposedly all "balanced" so that they're more a matter of preference rather than one being significantly stronger than another. –  agent86 Apr 29 at 15:38

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