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I have steam installed on my computer, but I recently found it something called steamcmd? I am not sure what it is or whether it is installed when steam is installed? What can I do with steamcmd?

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Can some basic research be done before asking about trivial things here? We expect some effort to be done on your own behalf before you ask here. –  Frank May 17 at 21:02

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The Steam Console Client or SteamCMD is a tool to install and update various dedicated servers available on Steam using a command line interface. It works with games that use the SteamPipe content system. Most games have now been migrated from HLDSUpdateTool to SteamCMD.

https://developer.valvesoftware.com/wiki/SteamCMD

Short: It is used to install server applications that need Steam to run.

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How does this relate to someone who wants to install skyrim on linux? –  linuxfreebird May 17 at 20:22
    
@linuxfreebird It doesn't. You don't need it. –  Assylum May 17 at 23:03

SteamCMD is the console only version of the Steam client. It has limited functionality and lacks a graphical user interface. For this reason it is mostly used download and update game servers in dedicated server environments, where no desktop or graphical interfaces exist.

You can also use it to download the games themselves, but most of them will require that normal Steam is also running, and you will need to login on your actual account instead of anonymous.

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How does this relate to someone who wants to install skyrim on linux? –  linuxfreebird May 17 at 20:39
    
@linuxfreebird It allows you to download Skyrim if it has been bought on your Steam account. –  3ventic May 17 at 20:46

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