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If you don't take damage from any champions for a short period before dying, then your death counts as an execution. What does this mean in terms of gold rewards given? In particular:

  1. Does the enemy team get any gold reward for your death?
  2. If you had a bounty on your head does that bounty disappear after you are executed?
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I'm really interested in the answer to the second point because you could take advantage of it if you are fed and thus have a big bounty. Basically execute yourself (via Nashor) and then the bounty on your head disappears. This means the enemy team will not benefit from killing you more than killing anyone else. –  Sadly Not May 28 '11 at 22:53
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this is not how it works. –  Raven Dreamer May 29 '11 at 1:25
    
That's probably for the best, yikes. –  Sadly Not Oct 28 '11 at 23:02
    
The bounty stays if you are killed by a neutral minion, the same as a killing spree. It only dissolves when you are killed by an enemy champion. –  Kirkalirk Mar 26 '12 at 16:48
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Also a very important thing to note is that executions do proc things like GA and you do loose BT or majais stacks upon death, even if its an execution. –  Jacimovski Aug 28 '12 at 15:06

4 Answers 4

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Execution means that you do not grant nearby enemies gold.

If you get executed, you also retain your killstreak and bounty.

If you know you are going to die (for instance, you have seen via clairvoyance that the enemy is coming and you won't be able to retreat) it is better to suffer an 'execute' to deny your opponents a successful gank. The kicker, however, is that you must not have been damaged or debuffed by an enemy champion within 10 seconds of death. (Often easier said than done)

Executions also don't show up on the "Team Kills" tally, though they do appear under a champion's deaths.

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leagueoflegends.wikia.com/wiki/Kill ==> An execution offers no gold but still gives experience to nearby champions –  Hystic Aug 28 '12 at 11:56
    
Could you please include, "If a champion dies and hasn't been damaged or debuffed by another champion in the last 10 seconds, it is an execution." –  Atav32 Aug 28 '12 at 16:58
    
@BBz Sure. In the future, do note that you can suggest an edit on this post, instead of asking me directly. :) –  Raven Dreamer Aug 28 '12 at 23:08

In the past if you were to execute yourself either by accident or on purpose to avoid giving your enemy additional gold, it would eliminate your kill streak reward for an enemy kill. Now however that is not the case as they removed that a few patches ago.

So now if you were to be executed your value to the enemy for a successful kill upon you would remain the same as before you were executed. This keeps players from killing themselves to deny gold to the enemy, but killing yourself after 10 seconds from being caused damage from the enemy will still deny the enemy the kill and gold until the next time they kill you.

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One thing I would like to add is that I believe you DO get some exp for an execute if you are in exp range, but no gold or kill credit. I am saying this because I saw people level up after chasing an enemy who suicided into a tower, but did not land any hits on him (there were minions nearby so I can not be 100% sure it was the execute though). I also heard casters during IEM Kiev mention this when a player suicided onto the nexus turrets with the enemy jungler chasing him, but failing to land any attacks. Again, I am not 100% on this one so if I'm wrong, please correct me, as I would also like this clarified =)

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this is correct –  Peter Jessen Feb 5 '13 at 21:58

http://leagueoflegends.wikia.com/wiki/Kill

==> An execution offers no gold but still gives experience to nearby champions

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