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I've been gaming for quite a long time, and have never had a game go bad on me, since I've always taken good care of my games.

However, one thing I've done differently over the years is the storage of my games. I've gone from storing the games with the system in a Rubbermaid container, to sitting them on a shelf, to storing them in boxes, and back to storing them on shelves.

Now I'm debating whether to go back to containers (separate, since my consoles no longer need to be put away). The ability to move the games around easily is the strongest selling point for me, but of all the setups I've seen I've never really seen anyone using any sort of container to store their games. Well, unless they're in college and their games are still in boxes.

Is there a reason, other than it looking cool, that most gamers seem to store their games on shelves of some sort? Is there any reason to, or not to, store video games inside closed containers?

By video games I mean disc based systems specifically, although cartridge games to some extent, if there's a difference.

You can also assume that all games are included in either their original packaging, or packaging similar to what they were released in.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Common sense care and handling should suffice. Keep the carts/discs clean and protected when not in use and they should last a long time.

A lot of people probably use shelves just for the sake that the games are then elevated (no floor dirt), out of obvious harms way and yet still easy to access when wanted.

My self, I keep my carts in a covered plastic box and my discs in CD/DVD books. Both forms of media still work as expected after 10 to 15 years.

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Which confirms what I thought. +1 and accepted. –  James Skemp Jun 20 '11 at 11:55

Sunlight will decrease the life of optical disks significantly. If they're out of the sun, at a remotely reasonable temperature, and you're otherwise taking care not to scratch them, you can store them however you want. Humidity might play a part too but unless it's extreme or mold is growing on the disks you'll be fine.

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Xantec got in first and included how he stored them, so I've accepted his answer, but +1. –  James Skemp Jun 20 '11 at 11:56

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