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I have found a few mods for minecraft I like a lot. I know you cant use them all at the same time. I know that some go together well, so how do I find out what goes with what?

Is there a way to load some for now, and unload them later so that I can change them out? I got a patch device but I don't think it works that well.

I tried to play with this stuff on my own but I got things so messed up that I had to delete everything and start over. So what am I doing wrong?

KH

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Voting to close as off-topic - but see gamedev.stackexchange.com/questions/7416/… –  BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft Aug 15 '11 at 20:44
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Are you talking for singleplayer or multiplayer mods ? Bukkit, modLoader.... please explain more. –  Warface Aug 16 '11 at 4:08
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This is on-topic, so not voting to close, but this question needs a lot of tidying up. What is the 'patch device'? What mod combinations have you tried? –  fredley Aug 16 '11 at 16:26
    
This question started off as a bad question, was edited to a reasonable question, rolled back to the bad question and closed, and has now be re-opened as another completely different reasonable question! –  fredley Aug 20 '11 at 22:14

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Mods will be compatible as long as they don't overwrite the same files in minecraft.jar. You can check this by looking at the class files in the mod (that have obfusticated names like a.class or bg.class, and you need to put into minecraft.jar) and checking that there's no overlap between the two lists of files.

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Is there an easier way than to just keep track of the file names that have been overwritten? Is there a way to merge two mods together such that they do work? –  Tom Wijsman Aug 16 '11 at 16:44
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Yes, but that would involve a manual merge of the two conflicting files, i.e. decompiling each version of b.class and merging the changes from the original b.java, and recompiling a version specifically to work with both mods. There are several modpacks which do this, such as the YogBox. –  fredley Aug 16 '11 at 16:49
    
I've never set it up, but I was under the impression that Bukkit mods did not have to overwrite anything in Minecraft.jar; Bukkit does all the hooking/overwriting, and exposes an API for mods to access instead. –  BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft Aug 16 '11 at 17:35
    
fredley, I've encountered a few mods that don't work together despite having no overlapping files. X-Ray 1.7.3 and InfinitiesLoop's Control Pack are one example. –  Fambida Aug 17 '11 at 5:32

Using Forge is a good way to manage mods. also you can compile different minecraft.jars with each mod setup and store them in an archive somewhere with relevant names (i.e. mc-worldedit.jar, mc-adventurecraft.jar, mc-vanilla.jar, etc) then just rename them minecraft .jar and drop them in your bin folder when you want to use one of them. In general I try not to use mods that require modifying the jar file. Forge lets you create a mod folder and just paste the mods you want there (if they are forge compatible). That way you can just make a mod library folder and move the ones you need into the live mod folder as needed without having to mess with compiling the jar (you will still need to add modloader and forge into the jar, but the rest can just go in the mod folder).

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