Take the 2-minute tour ×
Arqade is a question and answer site for passionate videogamers on all platforms. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I was thinking about sending a large army into a neighbor's village overnight to eat all their wheat. I am thinking that as soon as my army arrives, it will consume their wheat, and not my own.

  1. Is my assumption correct?
  2. Can I do it if they have an army in their village?
  3. Aside from leaving me a little less defended, and possibly losing troops whilst defending the enemy village, is there a downside to this plan?
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

You can reinforce an enemy village to steal their wheat. Whether or not the have an army there is irrelevant.

Four things to be aware of, though:

They can send your troops back at any time, simply by using a rally point in that village (assuming they're active enough to notice your troops stationed there).

You have no way of knowing their exact crop production, nor the size of their granaries, so you will have to make guesses as to whether they have enough crops to support your troops. If they don't have enough production to support your troops, your troops will eat their reserves. If they don't have enough reserves to last until you pull them, your troops will starve. A clever player can even use their marketplace to hasten the removal of crop reserves, making it more likely that you'll starve your troops if you send more than the village can support.

Your troops will always starve before theirs. When a village doesn't have sufficient crop to feed troops stationed there, troops start dying in a specific order, starting with any troops sent by other players as reinforcements first, and ending with troops produced by that village. You will always lose every single troop you send to reinforce before any of that village's troops will start to starve.

Offensive troops are lousy at defense, and if they have offense at another village, or a friend with an army, they will likely try to kill your army in their village if they're even remotely competent. If they aren't competent, chances are decent someone else is farming them, in which case they may attack your troops accidentally.

In short, yes, you can do it, but it's probably not a good idea.

share|improve this answer
  1. Your assumption is indeed correct. Your troops will eat the neighbours wheat.

  2. You can reinforce an ally if they have an army, that should not be a problem.

  3. You should be aware though, that if your neighbours wheat is down to 0, your troops will start dying aswell (as they eat your neighbours wheat)! Other than that, realize that your action will harm your relation with your neighbour.
share|improve this answer

Reinforcements refers to defenses sent from one city to another for the purpose of protecting it from an attack. Reinforcements can be temporary or permanent(AKA send and forget reinforcements). Reinforcements from a city that is deleted, conquered, destroyed will simply disappear from the city they were reinforcing. Reinforcements require crop/food/wheat from the city in which they are stationed and not from the city they are sent.

share|improve this answer
1  
Can you provide the source of this information? –  DrFish Feb 14 '13 at 12:40
    
@Bora All of the information here is accurate (at least for the versions of travian I played; I am not familiar with the newest version, but I understand that the version I played is still supported on some servers), aside from "permanent" being slightly misleading. However, the only part that is actually relevant to the question is "Reinforcements require crop/food/wheat from the city in which they are stationed". The other two parts of the question (can this be done when there is already an army in the village, and are there any downsides) are not at all addressed by this answer. –  Beofett Feb 14 '13 at 14:37

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.