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In Morrowind you could find grandmaster trainers who could train your skills. My question is who is the most powerful smith in Skyrim? I'm trying to build a master craftsman but I need the training to get to that goal.

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In my experience, especially for crafting professions, using trainers is so expensive that it's not worth it. Even at 99 it's only going to run you a couple hundred gold in materials to craft enough to skill up. –  zeonic Dec 8 '11 at 21:50
    
I posted this question a while back. ade my smith. It was easiest to just make iron daggers and leather gauntlets. haha..good times –  TombstoneTwo Dec 10 '11 at 17:50
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3 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Eorlund Gray-Mane; the blacksmith who owns the Skyforge in Whiterun.

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The second best smithing trainer is in Riften. To use him, however, you must bring him ten fire salts for his miniquest. After that, he will train you.

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Ill give that a shot. Thanks. –  TombstoneTwo Nov 17 '11 at 17:11
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Nobody can train you above 90. You'll need to get those last 10 points the old fashioned way. –  LessPop_MoreFizz Dec 8 '11 at 20:56
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@bwarner That's wrong. The smith in Riften is the Expert trainer (up to 75). –  Raven Dreamer Dec 8 '11 at 21:38
    
Deleted my incorrect statement, but it is still the case that you don't need to do the fire salts quest to train in Riften. –  bwarner Dec 8 '11 at 22:00
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If you're looking for a fast way to get to 100 smithing, I suggest just buying a bunch of leather strips and iron ingots from all the blacksmiths around the cities and then create a bunch of iron daggers. Doing this it took me around 1 hour and 4000 gold to get to smithing level 100, starting from around level 40.

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Even better, if you procure your own ingots/leather rather than buying them, you can actually make a fair bit of money doing this. –  Ben Blank Dec 7 '11 at 20:47
    
yeah but it's quite a pain to mine, it's faster to just fast travelling everywhere buying iron and leather strips and spamming daggers –  Louis Boux Dec 7 '11 at 22:50
    
— My own "procurement" tended to involve buckets and turned backs. ;-) –  Ben Blank Dec 7 '11 at 23:01
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protected by agent86 Jul 2 '12 at 16:09

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