Take the 2-minute tour ×
Arqade is a question and answer site for passionate videogamers on all platforms. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a new very fast internet, however I'm not sure if PS3 supports it (my laptop for example is only able to use 1/3 of the speed). How to check what speed PS3 can use?

share|improve this question
1  
I'm betting your laptop speed test was on a wireless connection? That severely reduces the practical speed, if possible use an ethernet (wired) connection for your PS3 and you should get closer to the "real" speed of your connection. –  Ben Brocka Nov 27 '11 at 16:16

2 Answers 2

On your XMB, go to Settings and choose Network Settings. One of the options should be Test Connection Settings. Wait for the test to end completely, the bottom two lines should show your tested download and upload speeds

share|improve this answer

It's highly likely that every device on your network is capable of speeds that are faster than your internet connection. The real bottleneck is whatever server on the internet you're trying to talk to is capable of, and how much "real" bandwidth you have available.

Most devices on your home network are capable of at least 100 Megabit per second (wired) or 54 Megabit per second (wireless, assuming 802.11g). Most broadband connections top out at a fraction of this; the fastest available in my area is 10 Megabit per second. (Other countries vary)

However, the speed of your network devices and internet connection are only part of what factors into overall speed. When you download something from the internet, you're sending tons of data back and forth to a remote server somewhere on the internet. That server may have other clients and limited bandwidth itself. Therefore, there's a strong possiblity that you won't be able to get a full 10 megabits per second. I tend to get pretty good download speeds from Steam, and major companies like Microsoft or Google.

Layered on top of this is the fact that often your internet service provider will advertise one speed and not give you that full speed all the time (or ever!)

Note that "megabits" are generally used to give network speeds, but you may be looking at "megabytes" per seconds in your download rate. If you need to convert megabits per second to megabytes per second, divide by 8. Therefore, 10 megabit per second internet service would allow you to download (at maximum, under ideal conditions) 1.25 megabytes per second.

To summarize, there are three speeds you have to be concerned with when trying to determine how fast you can download something from the internet:

  1. How fast can my device send/receive data? Usually this is very fast, 54 or 100 mbit.
  2. How fast can I send/receive data to/from the internet? This is determined by how much you pay your ISP, and how honest they are about giving you what you paid for.
  3. How fast can the remote server send/receive data to/from me? This is determined by conditions on the internet, and can vary wildly depending on the time of day, the server in question, conditions on the internet, etc.

The slowest of these three determines the overall download speed.

The most real-world test for download speed on your PS3 would be to try to download something off of PSN. Any other test is likely to give you artificial results.

share|improve this answer
    
i disagree, on laptop I have slower speed. i used special site that tests internet connection speed. –  IAdapter Nov 27 '11 at 16:02
1  
The laptop can send (likely) at least 54 megabit per second. Internet speed testers are also testing the speed at which your ISP allows you to send data (and, like I said, they fudge the numbers sometimes) and the speed at which the speed test server is capable of sending data. It's highly unlikely that your laptop is the bottleneck in this scenario. A more appropriate test would be to copy files between two computers on your network; but even then there's a decent amount of overhead in the file sharing protocols. –  agent86 Nov 27 '11 at 16:16

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.