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Note: Here be spoilers. I couldn't really figure out a way to ask this without them.

My Shepard is a female who plays (mostly) Renegade and also romanced Thane in Mass Effect 2. I have no idea if this plays out differently depending on whether or not you gained Thane's loyalty in 2, but for the record, I did.

After the attack on the Citadel and Thane becomes hospitalized, you can go see him. Depending on the option when Kolyat asks if you want to join him in prayer or not, the lines of the prayer Kolyat says change.

Renegade choice (declining):

Kolyat: Kalahira, this one's heart is pure, but beset by wickedness and contention. Guide him to where all hunters return, where all storms become still, where all stars show the path. Guide him, Kalahira, and he will be a companion to you as he was a father to me.

This version is obviously from Kolyat's point of view.

Paragon choice (joining):

Kolyat: Kalahira, this one's heart is pure, but beset by wickedness and contention.

Shepard: Guide this one to where the traveler never tires, the lover never leaves, the hungry never starve.

Kolyat:Guide this one, Kalahira, and she will be a companion to you as she was to me.

After this version, Shepard asks Kolyat why the end of the prayer used "she," and he responded:

The prayer was not for him, Commander. He has already asked forgiveness for the lives he has taken. His wish was for you.

How does the Paragon version of the prayer differ? I suspect that the line "Kalahira, this one's heart is pure, but beset by wickedness and contention" may differ based on whether or not your Shepard is Paragon or Renegade. In addition, how does the ending of this prayer change if you were either a female who did not romance him or were male?

Having to replay this scene over and over to screencap the dialogue for transcription may or may not have resulted in teary-eyed sniffles.

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There is no difference based on Shepard's morality. –  Raven Dreamer Mar 13 '12 at 20:22
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2 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The non-romantic paragon version of the prayer is (differences in bold)

Kolyat: Kalahira, this one's heart is pure, but beset by wickedness and contention.

Shepard: Guide this one to where the traveler never tires, the lover never leaves, the hungry never starve.

Shepard:Guide this one, Kalahira, and he will be a companion to you as she was to me.

The dialogue at the ending of the prayer is the same as you noted;

The prayer was not for him, Commander. He has already asked forgiveness for the lives he has taken. His wish was for you.

As indicated in comments the final line of the scene is different, with Shepard saying Good bye Thane, you won't be alone long. instead of Goodbye, Thane. Meet you across the sea.

enter image description here

You can view it at this link

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The ending isn't the same. My Shepard said something different at the end. Hers was "Goodbye, Thane. Meet you across the sea" which I believe is as allusion to the letter he wrote to her. –  FAE Mar 13 '12 at 19:38
    
@FallenAngelEyes Updated –  Tharius Mar 13 '12 at 19:41
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Shepard's sex has only a minimal effect. I play a paragon male who had not romanced Thane in ME2 and got a conversation very similar to yours.

Shepard: That prayer for your father was quite beautiful.

Kolyat: The prayer was not for him, Commander. He has already asked forgiveness for the lives he has taken. His wish was for you.

Given that our characters are basically opposites, it seems that paragon/renegade, romance/friends, male/female all have minimal impact on the dialog (other than the "she" used for Kolyat's speech giving away the intention).

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I can't remember the exact thing Shepard says to Kolyat, but I remember it leading into the same response from Kolyat. –  Dave McClelland Mar 13 '12 at 19:20
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