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I'm currently trying to determine how exactly the DPS calculation works. The only thing I'm not quite sure about is Magic Weapon, which gives me a huge dps boost. My unbuffed DPS is about 17k, using Magic Weapon increases my DPS to over 22k.

Has anyone already figured out what exactly magic weapon does?

Edit: I built a dps calculator based on the knowledge I got here: http://xraymeta.com

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Supposedly it should give 10% boost but is currently bugged and giving 20% (unruned Magic Weapon) –  Alok May 22 '12 at 10:36
    
Maybe this thread could help you: gaming.stackexchange.com/questions/67843/… –  Anto May 22 '12 at 11:51
    
A bug would explain this indeed. Do you have any sources to confirm this? –  Julian Hollmann May 22 '12 at 13:03
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up vote 11 down vote accepted

I have. It's pretty simple, really - it's double dipping. You get its effect twice.

First, it applies a modifier to your weapon damage - possibly unique, I haven't seen any other sources of a modifier like this - which is used in its own place in the calculation formula.

Second, it adds that same modifier to your skill damage bonus. This is why you'll notice your skill damage go up by 10% (15% with force weapon) in your details page of your inventory. So what ends up happening is magic weapon adds 1.1*1.1 = 1.21 = 21% bonus damage, instead of the listed 10%. (32.25% with force weapon rune)

The weapon damage modifier stacks multiplicatively with other sources of skill damage bonus, such as glass cannon and sparkflint - which all stack additively with each other. Glass cannon, sparkflint and force weapon combined would give you 15% + 12% + 15% = 42% skill damage modifier, and then there'd be an additional 15% weapon damage modifier, which would net you 1.42 * 1.15 = 1.633 = 63.3% damage increase.

(I played it fast and loose with two equals signs for the sake of brevity and clarity.)

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