Take the 2-minute tour ×
Arqade is a question and answer site for passionate videogamers on all platforms. It's 100% free, no registration required.

The wizard's Archon form has a couple of different attacks:

Arcane Strike: Hits for 250% dmg

Disintegration Wave: Hits for 300% dmg

From the skill description, its simple to just choose Wave which hits harder and has a long range as well. But I remember reading elsewhere that the strike can also have stun or interruption effects to help with stun locking enemies.

What are the occasions when I should be using Arcane Strike as a wizard in Archon form?

Update 1:

@dianod: I do know that AS is AoE around the area while DS is a straight line AoE, but thanks for bringing it up, it does affect which attack to use in some cases.

@Resorath: Found out about Knockback earlier by accident, that's more like the kind of info I'm asking here - e.g. I could knockback Fallen Lunatics to save myself, what other mods does AS have and when are they useful?

share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Arcane strike's big winner is it also acts as a knockback. You can chain knockback non-elite enemies to death, effectively trivializing large packs of dangerous monsters which your disintegration wave may not kill off immediately.

Basically, a safety in case something dangerous gets too close.

share|improve this answer
    
I only realized the knockback when I blew away Fallen Lunatics in Hell in a desperate attempt to kill them. Updated question, basically want to know any other mods and when they're useful. –  Alok Jun 12 '12 at 0:40
add comment

Arcane Strike is better than Disintegration Wave when you have a large number of enemies in a cone or semicircle shape in front of you, instead of coming at you in single file. In those cases Arcane Strike will hit all of those enemies, whereas Disintegration Wave only hits those in a direct line with it.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.