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According to the spell description, Ray of Frost deals 215% weapon damage and disintegrate deals 155% weapon damage. However, if I enable the damage numbers in the option menu I can see that I deal more damage using Disintegrate (besides, enemies DO die faster). I've tried it with a few monster types on Act 3, and it's unlikely that all types were resistant to cold. While this makes sense (Disintegrate is a higher tier skill after all) I don't understand why the spell description says the contrary. The only thing that comes to mind is that Disintegrate is somehow "faster" and hits more times.

So why is Disintegrate doing more damage?

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I think it's likely that Disintegrate has a faster innate tick rate. Equip both skills and alternate, and see if you can't figure out a difference in tick rates (use a slow weapon to expedite things). –  Raven Dreamer Jun 16 '12 at 1:53
    
Plus I think Disintegrate goes through mobs and Ray of Frost doesn't –  Holger Jun 16 '12 at 12:37
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@Holger Going through mobs doesn't change the damage that it does, it just means it can damage more than one mob at a time. –  Mr Smooth Jun 16 '12 at 13:41
    
@Holger Yes it goes through. But I'm not questioning balancing here –  Emiliano Jun 16 '12 at 13:42
    
I first have to ask are you using any passives/skills that increases arcane damage? If so that could be it. But from my experience with both skills it has to be one of two things: 1.) Disintegrate fires at a faster rate then RoF 2.) Many mobs have a weakness/no resistance to Arcane –  Xenogard Jun 21 '12 at 0:23
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up vote 3 down vote accepted

I just tested this ingame and i'm definitely getting bigger numbers for Ray of Frost. Monsters die faster because disintegrate hits many of them, but the numbers are smaller.

There must have been some other circumstance that changed in your tests, or there's some kind of passive effect only affecting one of them.

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