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I have a lot of games on Steam, far more than my puny hard drive can hold at once. However, in the future I may want to store all of them locally.

Is there any way to figure out about how much hard drive space I'll need to install all of my Steam games, including the ones that I don't currently have installed, without sitting down with a calculator and manually adding everything up?

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Nevermind, SteamCalculator.com shows you only the total value in money. –  DrFish Jul 26 '12 at 7:45
    
Interesting question. As far as I know, no tools exist for this purpose. –  DavidYell Jul 26 '12 at 8:24
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Note that such a number is always just a lower bound. Savegames can take up many hundred MB even for a single game nowadays. –  Hackworth Jul 26 '12 at 18:09

5 Answers 5

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Not to bump an old thread unnecessarily, but I just finished building the tool I think you're looking for:

MySteamGauge.com

Your profile has to be public and it's not perfect, but should give you a pretty close idea of what kind of hard drive space you'll need to install your entire collection (or on multiple drives, per Steam's new feature to specify install location).

Cheers!

[Edit] Just realized a screencap might be nice:

Typical results from MySteamGauge.com

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There are no old questions, just questions still waiting for a good answer. Necromancy is encouraged here! –  SevenSidedDie Mar 31 '13 at 16:10
    
I'll switch the accepted answer over to you because I'm not gonna keep that javascript thing up-to-date :) –  Tacroy Apr 1 '13 at 0:15

Short answer

Go to this jsFiddle, bookmark the link (it's a bookmarklet), go log in to Steam on your browser, look at Community -> Games -> All Games, use the bookmarklet (open it like you would a bookmark). You'll get an alert telling you the size on disk and the size you'd need to buy, approximately.

Longer answer

It turns out that when you visit the All Games page on your user profile, Steam stores information on them in a Javascript variable embedded in that page named rgGames. After a bit of messing around, I created a bookmarklet that will inspect that variable, sum up all the file sizes, and tell you the total size in both real and marketing terms.

The one caution I would have is that bookmarklets are a pretty insecure thing to use, so I strongly urge that you only do this if either you can understand Javascript well enough to know that my script is not doing anything sneaky, or you trust me. muahahaha A bookmarklet can do almost anything you can do on a website as a logged in user, so I could, I don't know, make all your games start installing on your computer or something (ssl should block the script so I don't think anything super important is vulnerable).

That being said, here's how you use it:

1. Go to this jsFiddle, right click the link, click "Bookmark this link" or whatever equivalent your browser has. Goooal no he saves!

2. Go to Steam, make sure you're logged in to your account, then go to Community -> Games -> All Games. Make sure you're looking at your profile, unfortunately you can't use this to calculate the total size of any of your friends' libraries. Once you're at the All Games page, click the bookmarklet in your bookmarks, and it'll do its thing. too many games

3. You'll get a popup kinda like this. The difference between "real" gigabytes and "marketing" gigabytes is a boring, complicated mess that nobody cares about and thankfully is going away with SSDs - just know that the "marketing" size is the amount of space you'd buy, the "real" size is the size you'll see on your computer if you install everything. All my bytes

Now, there are a couple of caveats: this isn't using any official Steam feature, so the method may very well stop working at any point without warning. Another problem is that at least one game is messed up on this page; see where it says that Trine 2 takes up 13.7 MB of space? That's filthy lies. The game takes up about 1.5 GB of space.

All that being said, however, this should give you a reasonable idea of how much space you'd need to store your entire Steam library on a disk. Just go up a couple of steps (plus however much more you want to store the rest of the kipple we all carry around everywhere between hard drives), and you should be good.

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Excellent work and nice closure to the problem. –  DrFish Jul 27 '12 at 6:09
    
This doesn't currently seem to work. The first issue I see is that Steam now uses binary prefixes, rather than SI prefixes, so game sizes are given in MiB/GiB, which causes the regex in the script to fail to find the sizes. There may be other issues as well, I haven't checked the script beyond that. Still, +1 for a creative approach. –  Indrek Mar 31 '13 at 17:22

I've been thinking about this off and on today, and while I don't have an answer, I have an idea for how the answer could be done. Borrowing from xkeeper's answer, I imagine an application that can scrape data from the "System Requirements" page at the bottom of each game's store page and crawl through all a user's games could knock this out and even provide a range between "minimum" and "recommended."

Now someone just needs to write it :)

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In the 10 hours that has passed since you've asked this question, you could have done it manually (now keep in mind, I'm not criticizing you, I'm just using this to point out that doing it manually might be the only way). For all the games that are installed, right click them in the Library menu, and click Local Files. It will tell you how much disk space is being used by that game. For those you don't have installed, just click on them, and click the Install button. Take Disk space required and cancel out of it. Write down all the values on a piece of paper and add them up with a calculator (or even better, write them down in a notepad program separating each one by an addition sign, and then enter it into Google and it should do it for you. You could also do it in Microsoft Excel, which would be good if you wanted to continuously update it).

Edit: For the adding-it-up-in-Google option, that will only work if you have less than 32 games... (because Google won't let you search more than 32 words).

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Actually I figured out a neat way of doing it, I just wanted to make sure I wasn't replicating some well-known Steam service. Also, adding them all up like that gets tricky to do by hand because some games are in KB, some are in MB and some are in GB; you'd have to do the unit conversions by hand too. –  Tacroy Jul 26 '12 at 16:13
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@Tacroy Could you post how? I'm interested to see, because I too have had problems with hard drive space and Steam games. Involving the issue of KB/MB/GB you would just have to pick a common unit (I'd go with MB, personally) and when your done, add a 4000-5000MB padding to the result to insure you have enough space (because to much is better than not enough!) The conversions themselves are pretty simple, I'd I can almost guarantee that Excel has a magical way of doing it. –  smoth190 Jul 26 '12 at 16:27
    
I was planning to, I only worked out the kinks after I'd asked the question. I also figured that if I self-answered immediately nobody would tell me "hey there's this website over here that'll do it" :) –  Tacroy Jul 26 '12 at 16:42
    
-1 for "In the 10 hours that has passed since you've asked this question, you could have done it manually." Fortunately, he asked this question instead, so he didn't have to to do 10 hours doing incredibly menial work, and was able to spend his time doing something more fun instead. –  BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft Jul 26 '12 at 17:21
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@BlueRaja-DannyPflughoeft In this case, sleeping :) –  Tacroy Jul 26 '12 at 17:26

Quick and dirty way, for games you already installed:

  • Browse to your Steam folder (usually \Program Files\Steam)
  • Select the "steamapps" folder
  • Right click it and select "Properties"
  • Wait a while for the total size to be calculated

This may not be entirely reliable if there's a game out there that doesn't play nice with Steam (and installs to an external folder...) but I haven't really ran into one, yet. For the most part it'll give you a good enough idea.

But...

If you're trying to do this for games you haven't installed, you're kind of out of luck, I've found. Outside of adding them up manually, you don't have many options. Sorry. (It doesn't help that some games may have varying sizes depending on what DLC you have, the kind of computer you're running, and whether Steam will have to install additional things to run the game, e.g. DirectX runtimes)

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Hmm yeah I meant including games I haven't installed. I'll edit the question. –  Tacroy Jul 26 '12 at 13:06

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