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I've tried many different trash can designs, but every single one has had at least one idiot wolf jump into it and die.

The first trash can I came up with is a pressure plate that opens a trapdoor with lava under it and an upside-down slab for safety. Obviously, wolves can still fit through there, and when I built this I didn't know that wolves are incredibly stupid.

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I also tried one where you throw the item over a block and it lands on a cactus, but for some reason a wolf walked into that also.

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The latest one is by far the safest, and the wolves mostly stay out of it, but recently one wolf pushed another one into it and the wolf didn't get back out. Sadly I didn't remove the water quick enough and it drowned. :(

This one I didn't create myself. Watch this video to see how it's made. (It's the last one that he talks about.)

Of course the best solution would be to make wolves smarter, but until that happens, is there a way to make this even safer without taking up more space? If you have a different design that you think works better, please share it.

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What texture pack are you using? –  Snuffleupagus Oct 25 '12 at 16:28
    
@Snuffleupagus He is using Sphax PureBDCraft. It is the best texture pack. –  user9983 Oct 25 '12 at 21:53

5 Answers 5

up vote 10 down vote accepted

This video tutorial I made (with co-conspirator Kaliard) demonstrates how to make a safe, easy-to-make, and stylish "trash can" incinerator using a chest, a hopper, and a dropper (those last two new in Minecraft 1.5) in a vertical stack, with a redstone clock to activate the dropper. The hopper pulls any items you put into the chest and puts them into the dropper, which ejects the items into a pool of lava in front of it when you throw the switch.

The benefits of this design are safety for you, your pets, and especially your items. There's no worry about accidentally hitting the "throw" key while holding your enchanted pick, as with open-pit designs. Because the redstone clock can be turned on and off with a switch, you can load up the trash can and be sure that, when you flip the switch, only the items that you intend to incinerate will be destroyed.

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This is by far the best method because it allows you to use the direct inventory interface. All the other methods require you to use the clunky manual throw/drop interface (aiming, dragging, throwing, etc.). –  Chris Redford Sep 29 '13 at 18:05

Make a toilet!

This way, nothing gets incinerated until a player activates it. I recommend using a button instead of a lever. That way, it resets itself.

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Good idea, but I would prefer something I can just throw items into without any extra step. –  Zephlon Oct 26 '12 at 21:58

You can always just drop items in a 1-block-high pit and ignore them, where they will despawn after 5 minutes and you won't pick them up unless you go into the pit. But if you really want to set things on fire, this will do:

Place 1 lava in a pit, then place a nether brick fence on top of it at the height where you throw items against it, and build walls on three sides.

That's a nether brick fence capping a lava pit. Items hit the fence and fall straight down into the lava, but the gap is not wide enough for any mob but chickens and silverfish to fall in. (The lava could be raised up one block if you want; I was designing this as I went and left it that way.)

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How about this design:

Trash

It does not require user interaction and flushes simply through water flow.

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What about the simple middle block open trash can? This is what I use and I haven't had any issues. I'm not able to capture a screenshot, but the premise is the lava is behind the top block when the blocks are placed like this

|_|
~~~
|_|

The lava represented by ~~~ is what's visible because it is flowing down from the above block which is keeping it from getting out.

It's important that the middle block is not at floor level of course.

I first saw the design by Dataless in this video.

You can see him using it at 4:33

The major advantage here is that your lava isn't on the ground. You can place it up as high as you want really, though I prefer it on the second block because I can run up to it and just drop items and leave, rather than having to look up or down first.

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It's a little unclear what you're describing, and answers should not rely on external videos (though giving credit by links is good!). Could you provide a screenshot of your build? –  Kevin Reid Oct 25 '12 at 16:18
    
@KevinReid I will post one this evening when I get home –  deltree Oct 25 '12 at 16:42
    
As described in the question, this would not be an effective way to prevent wolves from pushing one another in. (See cactus dispenser photo) –  Domocus Oct 25 '12 at 20:50
    
@Domocus yup, I figured that out in tests last night. I was trying to use FRAPS but it only allows 30 second videos and WMM wouldn't tie them together, I'm going to attempt to put this answer together correctly tonight. Additionally, I did come up with a completely wolf-safe design, so I'll be posting that as well. –  deltree Oct 26 '12 at 12:29

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