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29

A 144 Hz monitor would have a refresh period of 7 ms, and a response time of...whatever, doesn't matter. Typical human reaction time is in the range of a few hundred milliseconds, depending on the task, so reducing frame updates from 16 ms (60 Hz monitor) to 7 ms is not that great, a 5% savings assuming best-case. Here's a colorful plot from the paper ...


22

I disagree with both of the contributed answers to this question. They are right but for the wrong reasons. I believe LCDs don't work because of a technical limitation, but this talk about electron beams and "retrace lines" doesn't make sense to someone who understands the technology: a properly contrasted white box is all the light gun looks for. The ...


20

The NES must do the following to "read" the zapper: Wait until next frame starts Make the screen black, except for a small area where a target is Read the zapper to see if it's detecting light Wait until next frame starts Make the screen completely black Read the zapper to see if it's not detecting light If it detected light in both step 2 and 5, the ...


18

According to the online user guide, there is an apparent way to circumvent the PS3's shutdown: Even when [On] is selected, this feature (HDMI Control) may not be available in the following cases: When using certain features of the PS3™ system, such as gameplay or video playback. When the PS3™ system is not selected as the input source for ...


9

There are four main components to this question: Fluidity of motion: Try turning in any first person shooter. The difference between 60hz and 144hz is easily perceptible. So getting a 144hz vs 60hz monitor will definitely improve this. Having a more fluid image definitely helps with aiming. Clarity of motion: This has two components, depending on what ...


8

Your display resolution is a huge factor in the speed of games; turning the resolution down can result in drastically more smooth gameplay, but at a steep cost of picture quality. If your external monitor is of a lower resolution than your Macbook Pro's built-in display, then the game is playing at a lower resolution and therefore will run faster. I see no ...


8

Game mode is a setting on your TV that compensates for input lag mainly. you can read This article for more information about it, but basically it tweaks the TV (usually by turning features off) so it can meet the requirements of the game. Try it for yourself, watch TV with game mode on and off. you might see a few subtle differences in quality (color, ...


7

The main difference between a TV and a monitor, besides the TV tuner, is the pixel density. A Full HD-TV has a resolution of 1920x1080, which is similar to common monitors, but spread over a significantly larger area. The consequence of that is that the recommended viewing distance for a TV is much further away than for a monitor. In short, if you want to ...


7

To be able to use a 3D TV for computer gaming you need the following items: 3D TV. 3D Glasses. A HDMI 1.4a cable. A graphics card able to transmit 3D images. It is very important that you use a HDMI 1.4 or 1.4a cable, because earlier versions of the cable cannot transmit the frequencies needed for 3D. As for the graphics card in your computer, both AMD ...


7

The Nintendo 64 (along with the GameCube and the Super Nintendo, who share a common AV connector) outputs signals in a format called "Composite Video." Composite is an old analog standard for video output. With the addition of something called a "RF Modulator" (also known as a "RF switch") these composite video signals can be received by televisions that ...


7

Well lets see based on the screenshots below 4x3 16:10 16:9 As you can see, the wider the screen the more horizontal space you can view. Thus, a resolution with a 16:9 ration would give you the most in-game vision. Also notice, the vertical vision does not change on the screenshots. source: Widescreen Gaming


6

This is what you see when you plug a composite video output (yellow cable) into a component video luminance input (green port). Put simply, a Yellow/Red/White cable does not connect to Green/Red/Blue ports because Yellow (Video) and Red/White (Audio) do not match the signals for Green/Red/Blue (all Video). (For a full explanation, read on; or for the fix, ...


6

It may not improve your reaction time, but I've heard from others in the Counter Strike 1.6 and Quake scenes that the animation is a lot smoother and more fluid. Apparently, this helps with scanning and aiming a lot. A lot of people even prefer CRT monitors because the refresh rate is higher on them. Have you noticed the difference in fluiditiy between ...


6

While I can't speak for FPS-type games, having a high refresh rate on your monitor is basically mandatory for fighting games like Street Fighter. Fighting games often have incredibly strict input requirements. For example, you may only have 1/60th of a second to input a particular command. The time that the screen takes to refresh is basically like time ...


5

The only aspect of the display that influences performance in 3D games is the resolution. The higher the resolution that needs to be displayed, the greater the number of pixels the graphics card has to calculate and the lower the performance. If the resolution stays the same, changing displays can not influence performance. My guess is that you're running ...


5

Recent MacBook Pros have two GPUs and will keep one of them powered-down until needed (to save battery). It's likely that plugging in a second monitor is causing the idle GPU to be powered up so you're getting better rendering performance as a result. Try installing gfxCardStatus so that you can monitor what's going on with your GPU(s).


5

You can do it, but it's not terribly cheap. You need something like this: http://www.amazon.com/Pyle-PYPBHD40-Component-Converter-Support/dp/B0038P58HY The plug in the first answer won't get you there; it's for specific video cards that are capable of putting out component analog signals on particular pins on the DVI connector. You can't turn component ...


5

I was able to find an answer to this question here. Basically, the HDMI handshake doesn't work correctly between some TVs and the Xbox. The TV tells the Xbox to only allow PC-like display options if it's set to auto-detect the display settings. To fix this: Open the options on the Xbox Main Screen Right until you get to Settings Select Console Settings ...


4

The 3D TVs now coming out all support the HDMI 1.4 (or better) 3D standard, which is what the PS3 and other 3D blu-ray devices support. So yes, you will be able to mix and match 3D equipment from the player, to the cable, to the TV. The glasses are not standardized yet, though, so you will likely need to make sure that any extra pairs of glasses you ...


4

Preference In my opinion you shouldn't punish your non-gaming laptop usage just to run some game at a resolution lower than what is native. Moral: go as high as you'd like, 1920x1080 works well go me. I would also recommend, if you have a desktop and a laptop, to get the same resolution on your laptop as your desktop monitor. Performance My laptop is ...


4

I think 1440x900 is a good size for a monitor. It provides a high quality resolution whilst not being too large that the graphics card, which is likely to be less powerful that a desktop version, won't get stressed out. My concern with high resolution screens (~1920x1080+) is that the graphics cards will not being able to provide enough grunt and you will ...


4

Audio-wise, you are in luck, since you wish to use two different connectors and the PS3 can be instructed to output audio through several connectors. Simply connect both sound systems to the PS3 at the same time and turn on Audio multi-output and you should be good to go. Video is another matter, since you only have 1 HDMI connector on the PS3. The only ...


4

Not easily (or on the cheap). That display has only digital inputs, while the N64 only outputs analog video signals. Therefore you need a converter box. These come in many different shapes and sizes, generally the more expensive they are, the better the quality. They convert analog inputs (composite, or better S-Video) to HDMI or DVI output. But wait! ...


4

I have a plasma TV which was bought in January 2006 (5 1/2 years old at time of posting). I have used it regularly with a PS3 for 3 years. When I first got the TV I was concerned about burn-in so I was really watching out for it. I found that after playing a game with a HUD of some kind you could see some ghosting if you switched to something dark, e.g. a ...


4

Some considerations about IPS vs TN competition: IPS costs more than TN IPS reproduce colors better than TN IPS has a wider viewing angle than TN IPS has a slower response time (latency) than TN monitors (5-8 ms vs 2-5 ms) IPS (at the moment) does not support a 120 Hz refresh rate. Therefore if you want to play 3D games (e.g. using NVidia 3D Vision) on IPS ...


4

You're going to need something like this: http://www.ramelectronics.net/audio-video/video-converters/composite-video-to-hdmi-dvi/v363/prodV363.html The red, white, and yellow cables are known as composite cables, so you need a composite to HDMI/DVI converter.


4

You may want to look at alternate resolutions that match the aspect ratio of your display panel. It's probably 16:9 or 16:10. You may have tried other resolutions that don't match the ratio of your panel, which would explain the unused regions. LCDs work best when you use their native resolution, which is generally given in the specifications for your ...


4

Have you got a component video cable (that's the official Sony variant, but many generic ones are available for cheaper) for your PS2? Most PS2s came with composite video cables (1 video and 2 audio outputs) This cable has 3 video outputs and 2 audio outputs. You can pick them up cheaply nowadays. You can also edit the PS2's output format in its setup, ...


4

This is a setting on the Xbox itself, no the TV/monitor, however, as seen in various places, the setting isn't accessible on the Xbox when connecting by HDMI. What you need to do is get your standard Xbox display cable, connect it to a TV and make sure the switch on the cable is set to TV, after that the setting to display on PAL 60hz will be available, ...



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