Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

23

It helps to understand why you need/needed to open ports in the first place. Once upon a time, every computer on the internet had a unique IP address. However, with the rise of residential internet (and the decline in IPv4 address space), it became more and more popular to share an IP address amongst multiple devices via a scheme called network address ...


11

Not to get all "get off my lawn, whippersnappers!" or anything, but as someone who has been playing Quake off and on for about 2 decades now, I can tell you that there's not that much difference between 30 and 15 msec ping. I used to play on dial-up versus people on broadband connections (where a "good" ping for me was 200-300 msec, and a "good" ping for ...


8

There are several options that might help. The "official" USB-based Microsoft wireless adapter. As you've noted, it's a bit pricey, but it's officially supported and pretty much guaranteed to "just work." Use a wired-to-wireless "bridge" device. These plug into your ethernet port, but have a wireless radio in them that can connect any wired device to a ...


7

If you have Windows Vista or more recent, you can use the inbuilt resource monitor (admin privs required). Start the game Start searching for games Open the resource monitor (Win, resource monitor, Enter) You should find the game at the top of the Network tab. Click on the checkmark. Now, network activity from the game appears in orange on all graphs. ...


7

It would help if you specified a platform... I found that on PC's the windows firewall is the worst culprit of annoying issues during our LAN party's. Recently I started using an old 24 port Dell power connect switch and using all static IP's. This works well for games with true LAN support but not so good for games that require DRM that talks back to an ...


7

I'd recommend using a wired connection with the ps3, especially if you live in a densely populated neighborhood. The reason I say this is not even about speed, but about reliabilty. The ps3 wireless is 802.11g, which operates at roughly the same frequency as microwave ovens, and a lot of other stuff. If you're just browsing from a PC, you might not even ...


6

Make sure the following ports are open to the XBOX. According to the support site these are the ports used by XBOX Live TCP 80 UDP 88 UDP 3074 TCP 3074 UDP 53 TCP 53 For Media Extender you need: UDP 3776 TCP 3390 UPnP Framework Media Center (on your PC) usually found at c:\windows\ehome\ehshell.exe I don't know precisely what settings are necessary ...


6

Borrowing liberally from the other answers, here are my suggestions: Keep It Simple. This applies to everything at the LAN. The simplest solution is almost always the best one. Networking - Hardware Side. (This is assuming you're going to have 24 or fewer users. If you're going to have more than that, you're probably going to need more than one switch.) ...


6

I did a little bit of monitoring using Windows 7’s built in Resource Monitor (not the best monitoring tool around), and here are my observations: When the game itself is just loading, the send and receive speeds hover around 5‒8 KB/s. The largest bandwidth load was on actually loading the map with receive speeds hitting upwards of 130 KB/s, and send speeds ...


5

Please be aware that on any reasonable GigE interface, the throughput difference between standard and jumbo frames is less than 10%, probably less than 5%. Between any two GigE-equipped MacBooks, I can get ~945mbps of TCP throughput on standard sized frames. Jumbo frames may push that to 980 or 990, but that's not a huge improvement. If your transfer times ...


4

Depending on the hotel set up (I used to work for a company that did this exact kind of thing), you may or may not need to have your Xbox passed through the connection so you don't get billed twice (unless it's already free). There is no difference, but if you call the help desk, they may put through your xbox directly (if you can provide them the MAC ...


4

Wireless works fine for Xbox System Link. Microsoft's help page for system link states: A system link cable or crossover cable for each console, an Ethernet hub or switch with enough open ports to connect the consoles together, or a wireless networking adapter for every console. The more recent version of the Xbox 360 has a wireless adapter built-in. ...


4

You absolutely don't need port forwarding. Port forwarding is only necessary if you host a (game) server behind your router/firewall which is not the case, neither with Diablo III nor with World of Warcraft. In both games all game sessions are hosted on Blizzard's servers. The following router setup should work no matter how many people are playing World of ...


4

Luckily for you, Minecraft uses SRV records when looking up servers. This allows you to specify a port for each hostname. Simply create two different SRV records in your DNS zone with different hostnames and ports: _minecraft._tcp.www.server1.example.com. <TTL> IN SRV <priority> <weight> 25565 actual-host-server.example.com. ...


3

Getting a higher-tier internet connection will probably not improve your ping. All networked XBox 360 games are required to keep their bandwidth below 8KBps; the requirements for PS3 are likely similar. With a 4mbps (500KBps) connection, you will be using less than 2% of your total bandwidth. Your ping is the time is takes a packet to make it from your ...


3

Probably not. The biggest thing you can do to improve your performance is to purchase a higher-tier internet speed with a larger bandwidth. As you've probably figured out, the 4 mbps you're getting is nowhere near the limit of your router (150 mbps). This implies that the router is more than capable of handling the data you're sending through it, and the ...


3

I had a similar problem. My PS3 was connected wirelessly to my network. The base station was in my office, at the other end of the house. I would get abysmally low bandwidth when streaming internally or from the internet. My solution was to move my base station into the entertainment center and connect the PS3 to it via ethernet. Ever since, I've not ...


3

This is a well known issue of the game since its release. See here: http://www.saintsrow.com/community/go/thread/view/136781/28692595/Lag_while_in_co-op_lan The problem is not in your hardware, system or network. The problem is in the game engine. But neither the game developer - Volition, nor THQ -publisher, even commented on the issue yet, let alone ...


3

I don't know of any way of making the PS3 act like a server. It certainly doesn't support access via FTP, SAMBA or anything similar. You also cannot access data on the PS3's hard drive by plugging it into a PC. The hard drives are encrypted and the data format is not supported on PC. Not only can you not put the hard disk in a PC, you can't even put it ...


3

As this is happening across two different computers, I suggest it might be a ports issue. Make sure the ports for the games you want to play are open. This site is a good place to start if you don't know what to do, and this page is useful in working out which ports each game requires. Alternatively, it could possibly be a firewall issue if both your ...


2

Looks like it could possibly be your router config. Did it work previously then stop either randomly or after an update? There's some surprisingly sane information about ICMP here (ignore the "Best Answer" and look at the other longer one). If you know your way around a router then you could stick the xbox in the DMZ. If that solved your problem you could ...


2

After a couple hours of additional net-scouring, we tried a lot of suggestions, and when it finally worked, of course we'd changed a few things. So, in our case the solution was one or all of the following: Move the GFWL-required ports from port-forwarding (on the router) to port-triggering Disable all non-related (virtual) NIC adapters (in our case, they ...


2

Electricity is the real tricky bit with a LAN party. Get extension cords and tap into to as many different circuits as you can. Normal outlets are rated at 15 amps, which will probably handle 3 gaming computer setups under full load barring any Crossfire or SLI behemoth, and maybe 10-12 gaming laptops. Consider renting generators depending on the scale of ...


2

If you use a router, try to open 6112-6117 UDP ports. And also to make better latency of while playing games. Try to use Chaoslauncher and make rooms with #L2, #L1 at the end. Although you will be able to play with players with launcher with that title name. You can feel like you're playing in UDP or IPX but not in Battle.net


2

WoW is using P2P to distribute map data without putting load on their servers, this can be disabled. However WoW still uses ports that could be flagged as P2P. See this walkthough on how to disable the P2P data transfer for both the downloader and the client and see if that fixes your issue. UPDATE: Changed the link for the walkthough to one that includes ...


2

had the same problem with a friend, we solved following the howto on this link on youtube and also opening the following ports on our router: TCP: 80, 443, 9988, 42127 UDP: 3074, 3659, 6000, 25200 maybe it's helpful for you too (this doesn't work for everybody)


2

So, observing last mile internet performance is notoriously hard. Depending on your wireless card you may be able to monitor signal strength over time (you'll also want to watch for noise, in many wireless environments this is a limiting factor). Additionally, you could plug a computer into a land line to compare performance. However, if this is a down ...


2

Here's the thing about data transfer and the device it's connected to. While I suggest you keep looking for a fix, the main thing about Bandwidth utilization is that even if a great quantity of data is being sent to your PS3 by your router, it's dedicated network processor can only process so much data, and Sony limits this to save on procedural resources to ...


2

You need to specifically browse for a media server on your 360. From Belkin: With a USB hard drive or flash drive plugged into your router's USB port, you can share files, video, photos and music with computers and DLNA compatible devices within your network, including your PSP. Specific guide: Xbox 360 set up Related guide: PSP media ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible