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15

So the Wii Joystick uses a Blue Tooth interface which is a little different than the N64 controller. As a result this answer deals more with the latter than the former. The N64 controller uses a single transmission wire on which it encodes bits to send signals back to the N64 console. To accomplish this bits are encoded on that wire as follows: This ...


13

Once you have 70 stars, the staircase is no longer endless and you reach the door at the top. Or the long jump trick to reach the top of the staircase without 70 stars is: Do a long jump away from the stairs, then tilt the control stick up. Mario should still be doing long jumps and facing you, but at the same time going up the stairs instead of down. ...


12

The N64 analog stick is extremely unusual. It does not use potentiometers, as most other platforms (i.e. playstation controller), but instead used a geared-up digital incremental rotary encoders. This is also why you have to have the control stick centered when the system turns on. Since the stick mechanism has no concept of "centered", the N64 assumes ...


11

I agree with George Stocker about using it to get through slower shortcuts, and also to knock around other racers. However, my personal experience seems to suggest that giving it a bit of time in between presses of the [Z] button seems to help maximize the boost's effect. Of note is one of the reasons why I think it does so: It makes it much easier to ...


10

Okay, I've did some testing, and, it really doesn't matter much how you use it, as using a "pumping motion" (leaving a slight delay between each usage) or "pressing it as fast as you can" give both a direct boost to maximum speed, the item has a fixed usage time, and you can't double up on the boost. HOWEVER, the most important thing, for efficient usage, ...


8

Honorable and Dishonorable are related to how often you shoot players in the back. They aren't a measure of how many kills or deaths you got. Double Kill If you manage to kill two players at one time. Triple Kill Self-explanatory--kill three at once. Quadruple Kill Smooth move, you killed everybody. AC-10 When you ...


8

The Nintendo 64 (along with the GameCube and the Super Nintendo, who share a common AV connector) outputs signals in a format called "Composite Video." Composite is an old analog standard for video output. With the addition of something called a "RF Modulator" (also known as a "RF switch") these composite video signals can be received by televisions that ...


8

I think it is best to tap quickly. If you go into single player mode and cycle the HUD using c - right you'll eventually come upon a speedometer display. It is apparent that a boost is relatively short lived; it is ineffective long before the exhaust color returns to normal. If you play around with it in SP you should eventually find a rhythm that ...


7

Ideally you want to use it to get around a section of track that would normally slow you down; grass, the not-so-deep water, and gravel are just a few examples. You also want to use it if you're a lighter weight character (toad, et. al.) against heavy-weights (Bowser, Wario). As far as what is 'better'; it only lasts for a certain period of time whether ...


7

These are the Developer's best recorded times... Defeat Wizpig for the second time. After the ending and credits, a series of times will be listed. These times are the best times recorded (in Time Trial mode) by Nintendo and Rare staff during the production of the game. There is nothing special (in-game) for beating these times. Source: ...


7

The pop you heard was a popping capacitor, while the smoke was probably the chips frying. The system is almost certainly not salvagable (and even if it were, it would take significantly more time/effort than it's worth). Sorry, but you'll have to buy a new N64. Be glad nothing else caught fire. While you're at it, throw out that adapter and buy a proper ...


7

Checked solder points on back, two were broken. Re-flowed them and had to jump them to the next point on the trace. Game now works. Will upload photos when I get home The two broken points soldered back to the corresponding pin.


6

A simple google reveals many potential explanations, but it's a common problem with older North American N64s and darn near impossible to accurately diagnose without trying almost everything. The hardware is notoriously finicky, now quite old, and generally difficult to troubleshoot. Common explanations include overheating, dirt, and hardware failure. ...


6

It would appear that the Transfer Paks are compatible no matter which region the system is from. I'm gathering this information from this article (IGN) which states, "The Japanese Transfer Pak is completely compatible with US Nintendo 64 systems and games that support the unit."


5

Nope you can't. http://forums.megagames.com/threads/saving-on-starfox-64.2177/ The game isn't very long you can beat it in one sitting if you wish


5

There are at least two ways of doing this, one easy way and one hard way. The easy way: Buy a USB Adapter. Although these have been discontinued, there might be some similar products on Ebay (Included a Ebay link with similar products). The hard way (Do it yourself way): Making a PIC board, which can support it. A reasonable tutorial to doing this can be ...


4

I'm not sure how the old N64 analog joysticks worked, but the newer ones are often built using two potentiometers at right-angles with one-another, where the joystick is constrained by two guides that are actually connected to the wiper. Perhaps they use a part like in the following image, which even includes a switch when you press down on the stick ...


4

Not easily (or on the cheap). That display has only digital inputs, while the N64 only outputs analog video signals. Therefore you need a converter box. These come in many different shapes and sizes, generally the more expensive they are, the better the quality. They convert analog inputs (composite, or better S-Video) to HDMI or DVI output. But wait! ...


3

First of all, NUS-006(01) is the part number of the N64 cartridge (please refer to Maru-chang's introduction page), so it won't help. You have to ask the seller (if possible) to provide the game serial (in NUS-NSMx-xxx format for Smash Bros) to check out the information on that cartridge. As for European cartridges, not all games support language-switching, ...


3

I believe you're talking about the cannon outside the castle in Super Mario 64 - this cannon will launch you up to a secret area, but only if you've got all 120 stars. For getting all the stars and accessing this secret cannon: ...


3

You needed a 25 Pin Male to 25 Pin Female printer lead back in the day, but most PCs don't have that port anymore. Easiest way to go about it is dust off the old XP machine as the software won't run on the newer OS. Here's the Manual if anyone needs it, good luck finding the software if you don't already have it though ...


3

This usually happens with older cartridge-based consoles. The game and the console can work perfectly fine, but when you insert the game, you have to make sure all the pins line up and connect or you'll get a black screen. Remove the cartridge and reinsert it, then try the power again. You could also try blowing into the cartridge, as this has (perhaps ...


2

I'm not sure if this is on-topic or not, but digital devices like joysticks send a digital signal by constantly changing the voltage in the wire from ON (usually 5V) to OFF and back at a certain time interval. A sequence of on/off values like this is interpreted as a bunch of bytes which have some kind of meaning to the device. For instance (totally ...


2

The best way to use it is to go really fast. You can't be that picky considering the longer you save it, the less other items you can acquire. Also, saving items tends to become frustrating when an attack causes you to lose them, might as well have used it when you had the chance and move to the next item quickly!


2

There is no image on the screen when an N64 is turned on with no cartridge (but mine hums). So it may be the game that is faulty.


2

You can buy a USB N64 controller ($10 on ebay).


2

There is not much difference, only that you name it and... Another difference is the little slot or notch that holds the game into the SNES when it's powered on. The origional release has the slot, which is the older style of SNES carts. The re-release has this area notched to the bottom of the cart, the newer style of SNES carts.


2

I found this site while trying to get an image of the connector. I'm not sure if you are going to find someone who knows the direct pin-outs but I also recall that this device used a standard parallel cable to connect to a PC. I bought one of these GameSharks when it fist came out and I seem to recall that my families printer cable worked just fine with ...


2

I got the exact same problem. It's overheating, the base of the system suffocates when it's over any surface (except the anti thermal ones I guess) because there's no decent airflow. The solution is very simple and you don't need to tear it apart or buy a new one. I found that you just need to get it off the ground with the help of some supports. Try to find ...



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