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3

Wikipedia's entry for Scorched Earth calls it an "artillery video game": Scorched Earth is a popular shareware artillery video game, which is a subgenre of strategy game. Following the trail, the entry for the artillery game genre is informative: Artillery games are early two or three-player (usually turn-based) video games involving tanks fighting ...


3

As far as I can tell, the objective of the members of those clan with 'Req and Leave' (or 'Req and GTFO') is to gain exp/complete the achievement (the one which requires a number of Clan troop donating) for gems. It's just for the decorations unlocked through leveling/for the achievement since level in COC doesn't affect War/Farming.


1

Request is to request for troops using the "Request Troops" option which can be selected after tapping on your clan castle. Some clans impose restrictions and rules on troop requests as there are many people out there who clan hop or repeatedly ask for troops without giving anything in return. Leave is to pretty much leave a clan, which is the big red ...


0

For many Nintendo games, e.g. Super Mario Galaxy, it's called the game. The ostensible victory condition and end of the story (such as it is) are achieved very quickly, with perhaps 90% or more of the world and puzzles still remaining to be explored and completed.


2

I've heard it called, and call it myself, the Post-Game sandbox, which to me includes side missions that you start after the main "game" is finished.


0

Generally speaking, this type of content would fall into the "optional content" category. So optional end-game content or optional post-game content make sense.


10

The LEGO series of games normally allows "free play" after the main quests are done. You may go back and complete optional objectives that you did not complete before. In addition, there may be bonuses that are impossible to get on the first playthrough. For example, perhaps level 1 has a secret requiring a specific ability to achieve, but the LEGO character ...


0

In literature its called denouement, the part, after the main action, where loose ends are tied up.


1

First word that comes to mind is, denoument. Definition: The events following the climax of a drama or novel in which such a resolution or clarification takes place. Although this might better asked on http://english.stackexchange.com/


12

There is not widely agreed upon terminology for the example you've given (ability to play content which you could have played before completing the game after completing it). As others have already answered terms like "Epilogue" or "Post-game" are fairly common. There are some more specific cases of "play after completion" with more well-defined ...


2

I usually hear this referred to as the Soft Timer (I realize the enemy itself is not a timer, but this is still what people call it). "Soft Timer" is opposed to a "Hard Timer", which causes you to lose immediately when it runs out. Examples: Here and here various users call the ghost in Spelunky the soft timer Here some users refer to the Rebel Fleet in ...


37

I would call it the epilogue.


10

I've always considered this to be called the "post game". As another example the Pokemon series has lots of content after you see the game's credits.


50

"Post-completion" or "post-game" is what I commonly hear. Sometimes people will qualify it as "post-main-quest" or similar. This is distinct from "new game plus" types of replayability that simply restarts the game allowing you to keep some stats or items or whatnot.


-6

When talking about the the retro gaming 8bit, 16bit, and 64bit. It simply means the amount of pixels used to create the images for example the NES and Sega Mega Drive are very blocky and has large pixels 8bit the SNES and Sega Genesis improve this to "16 bit" and the N64 masters this concept to 64-bit and so on to 128 to 256 and eventually to 1080 HD. Even ...


-1

These type of games are generally, tongue in cheek, labeled as walking simulators. Which is what I prefer to call them, while being completely serious and rather liking the genre. You could call them Dear Esther-likes. Their is most often quite a prominent strain of exploration, which they all share which can make calling them "Exploration" games or even ...



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