New answers tagged

-1

TVTropes suggests a couple of alternatives: True Final Boss - for those times when they are actually the real boss, but you can only get to them under certain circumstances. There's also Bonus Boss which seems to be a little closer to what you're referring to: The Bonus Boss is one that often exists outside the normal plot of the game, and requires ...


-1

I've always seen them referred to as "Extra bosses" or "Optional bosses"or even in the case of those which are extra hard "Super bosses". Since they are not required for game completion, but that doesn't necessarily mean they're stronger than the final boss. A possible alternative is "Postgame bosses", but that strictly refers to something unlocked after ...


3

Beyond Powerlord's excellent answer, competitive play in TF2 tends to look a little different than the normal action on the public servers. Teams play and practice together for extended periods of time and rely heavily on voice chat to coordinate their pushes, as opposed to the random teams and random chatter on pubbies. Games usually follow the standard ...


8

There are really two types of competitive in TF2. The first is the more structured league play that has been done in leagues such as ESEA and UGC for 6+ years now. This involves a lot of coordination outside of the game itself to set up and, depending on the league, may have a lot of item restrictions in place that are enforced by TF2's built-in Tournament ...


29

The Nuzlocke Challenge is a challenge that fans have created for the Pokemon games in order to increase the difficulty of the games. It has been named after the Nuzlocke's comic series that you are talking about. The common rules of that challenge are the following : Any Pokémon that faints is considered dead, and must be released or put in the ...


6

Burst characters are on the opposite end of the spectrum from sustained damage characters. Look at Xbalanque. His damage tends to be linear over time. If you fight him for 5 seconds, let's say, he might do 1000 damage. If you fight him for 10 seconds, he'll do 2000 damage. He just deals damage at a constant (fast) rate for the duration of battle. He's a ...


5

Generalized, the term I see and hear the most for these kinds of things is "floating" text. It can be more specific: Dragonrage's answer mentions combat text or damage text, but it isn't restricted to a combat scenario. Floating text is often used to contextualize numbers or short phrases by causing it to float near whatever it's meant to represent - ...


-1

Years ago, these were called installation missions. Some Google searching suggests that this term probably isn't in common usage at this point. You can find it in some walkthroughs or reviews of the original Starcraft. I believe this term is in reference to the Jacobs Installation mission, which was the fourth mission in Starcraft, and the first one without ...


7

Two different names I have commonly heard used are Combat text or damage text. Both are used fairly frequently and are interchangeable, though in my personal experience, I have heard damage text used more frequently. See links for examples of use in games. Combat text generally also includes things like status effects as well. Damage text is just "damage ...


1

I have a few aditions to what other users already pointed out: You can use Recycle if you have time for a spare turn, to get the Focus Sash back afterwards. If you have an effective heal buff pack on your field, e.g. a combination of Aqua Ring, Leech Seed and Ingrain recieved with Baton Pass, you can even re-use the technique in the same battle. The Aron ...


42

In a nutshell, the F.E.A.R strategy uses a low-level Pokemon to take advantage of the move Endeavor, which lowers an opposing Pokemon's health to your current health. Couple this with a way to survive One-Hit KOs (OHKOs) such as the item Focus Sash, and a way to deal the small amount of damage needed (a Priority move such as Quick Attack, Poison/Weather ...


53

FEAR strategy is probably not a great choice for a normal playthrough of the game. It means: Focus Sash, Endeavor, Quick Attack, Rattata. The pokemon doesn't have to be a Rattata, but Rattata makes a good choice. You'd make sure that your level 1 Rattata (or other pokemon who can learn this moveset) has a Focus Sash equipped. On your first turn of battle, ...


2

As far as I can tell, there's no official answer. The "true" answer may be that it just sounds cool. However, I do have several more promising theories than a song that came out years after the game ;) From Rock and Heavy Metal Allusions in Guilty Gear: The "Heaven or Hell" that appears before a match arguably comes from the the symbolism of Ky and ...


0

Epic points are earned by building epic buildings. An epic building takes 24 hours to complete, and during those 24 hours, you're set certain tasks that will earn you from 1-3 epic points. The number of points you earn while your building is being constructed determine whether your building will product bronze, silver, or gold tokens daily. The more of them ...


-2

Yes there is, It is called a Wallhack. A cheat that makes walls translucent. Some wallhacks also let players shoot weapons or physically pass through walls. Although this term is usually used for an actual cheat, I believe it serves to explain exactly what is happening in your game. It could also be called an exploit, but you are in fact not exploiting ...


1

Yes, "ult" stands for your ultimate ability, usually requires a buildup of some sort and is almost always incredibly powerful. Shown here, an example from D&D Neverwinter, the large orange gem in the center slowly fills as you damage your enemies, when it is full, you can use your "daily power" a reference to D&D. It is in other words, your ...


0

Although the actual definition is never revealed within the game, a weapon that is classified as a FOW is a weapon that has been infused with Bavarium. Any weapon infused with Bavarium is classed as a "FOW" weapon by the Medici Military. The exact definition of "FOW" is never revealed in the game. It is sometimes pronounced as an abbreviation, whilst at ...


1

Some people call older game music Chiptunes. It doesn't necessarily fit all game music, but there is quite a lot of overlap if you do some research. Searching YouTube for "chiptunes" will provide quite a few links that sounds like game music, even if they are not directly from games.


1

Shorter answer: Personally, I use "Game" as the primary genre for game music in general and "Game Remix" for (I'll wager you guessed this) Remixes of old Beatles songs... heh. I tend to use multiple tags for genre, though, so I tag with console (e.g. "SNES", "NES", "Genesis", "Saturn", et cetera), as well. "Chiptune" means 'tunes generated by embedded ...


-2

This is confusion of type and subtype: A "mod" is any change to the basic system, however that's accomplished. Just short for "modification". If it's different, you modified it. A "plugin is simply a modular change that the developers planned to accommodate without needing to change the existing files. That is, it calls the changes in the plug-in when ...


7

This is a bit of a tricky one, because the terms are used interchangeably in the gaming world, and have changed in meaning over the lifetime of gaming. As you said, they both modify gameplay, but I think the difference between them comes in how they are made and run, and their size/scope: Plug-ins, as suggested by their name, are things which are plugged ...


30

As you mentioned Minecraft as a prime example of game regarding your question, here is a Minecraft related answer: Wrapper: Sits between the Java runtime and Minecraft server -- usually provides extra functionality externally (i.e. providing remote management, querying, statistics, and uptime assurance) and work by simply inputting commands to the ...



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