1,864 reputation
1410
bio website duckmaestro.com
location United States
age 30
visits member for 3 years, 9 months
seen Dec 3 at 22:36

Self-taught programmer. B.Sc. Mathematics at UCLA (2006) and M.Sc. Computer Science at UCSD (2013). My other interests include economics, philosophy, and linguistics.


Profiles: Twitter @duckmaestro | LinkedIn @cliffordchampion

Where I work: zSpace (very cool technology. check us out.)



Jul
6
comment What's different in Deus Ex: Human Revolution Director's Cut?
I wish Valve would import/merge my steam achievements into Director's cut from non-.
Jan
4
comment Why do video game framerates need to be so much higher than TV and cinema framerates?
Auto-moved to chat. continue this discussion in chat
Jan
3
comment Why do video game framerates need to be so much higher than TV and cinema framerates?
@tzenes regarding your second comment, can you elaborate on how you are deriving your formula and what you are applying it to in my example? Regarding, "What's more a 100ms lag for data transfer is not comparable to a 24ms lag", I make clear the relationship by characterizing it as roughly 25% of the lag [...]. And lastly, modern video games still do not provide physically accurate motion blur (because the payoff is not worth the GPU cycles), generally speaking-- though it is a matter of time eventually I suppose.
Jan
3
comment Why do video game framerates need to be so much higher than TV and cinema framerates?
@tzenes regarding your first comment, I'm not sure how that is in direct response to my first point. My first point is about latency internal to the game (and client-server workings). Any latency in the human biology, whatever figure that may be, still must be added to the internal latency inherent to the game engine and client-server connection.
Nov
24
comment With proper aim can an Ambassador always one-shot a sniper?
Great video, btw.
Nov
21
comment Why do video game framerates need to be so much higher than TV and cinema framerates?
@Jeff, I would not trust that video. If you pause at :28 and look at the 30 FPS sample, that is not at all what natural motion blur looks like (notice it looks like 4 frames overlayed, rather than one continuous blur -- this means 4 different exposures with shutter open/close between each -- something screwy in the editing or post processing).
Aug
22
comment Why do video game framerates need to be so much higher than TV and cinema framerates?
@GQCK, however input is usually buffered not processed by the game logic immediately (because of threading). However that's really besides the point. You could be processing input 200 times per frame, but if you're only updating the screen at 20 times per second the user only experiences responsiveness of 20 times per second, which is what my point #1 is getting at.
Jun
30
comment Why do video game framerates need to be so much higher than TV and cinema framerates?
Thanks for the vote. I'd add that motion blur (or lack of) plays a part too even when input is not involved. For instance watching a demo or benchmark scene (where the user has no input) at 24 FPS would actually look a bit choppy without any motion blur.
Jun
29
comment Why do video game framerates need to be so much higher than TV and cinema framerates?
-1. Needs more sources, and I'm not convinced of some of the claims' relevancy.