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I know that artificial light (i.e. lights generated by lamps, torches, et cetear) affects sneaking, but I'm not sure if this applies to natural light (light generated by the sun) as well.

Does natural light affect sneaking?

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    Are you talking about screen brightness or how easy it is for enemies to detect you? – kotekzot Feb 10 '14 at 4:23
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    I don't like the way that this question has been rephrased. While it's good to set the precedent, I don't doubt that natural light affects detection. I may get this out of the way by finding some consistent test, so that I may move on to asking my original question. – NiteCyper Feb 11 '14 at 0:50
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    How is player-character visibility (as referring to its usage in another, great answer) not a reference to in-game usage of that word or concept? It seems that you didn't even vote to close it based on that reason. – NiteCyper Feb 11 '14 at 23:15
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    @DavidM I just checked out the revision history, and I don't see how this question in both its original and current revision is asking about the definition of a word. It's asking about how a game mechanic (light or luminosity) works in TES V: Skyrim. – galacticninja Feb 12 '14 at 4:17
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    I don't see how this isn't a duplicate, now that it's been completely reworded. The original one asks about light in general, of which this would be a subset. – Frank Feb 12 '14 at 15:25
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According to the Elder Scrolls Wiki entry on Sneak (emphasis added):

Characters' and animals' ability to notice the Dragonborn is dependent on a large number of factors, including their Sneak skill, line of sight, the level of light on their current position, how heavy the sneaker's armor is, whether this armor is heavy or light, enchantments on the armor (muffle), spells cast (muffle), if weapons are drawn, if magic is equipped, how fast they are moving, and the effects of any active perks.

So, the time of day may not directly effect your ability to hide, but the ambient light in your current location does, and that can be directly effected by the rising/setting sun, full moon, etc.

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To answer the question as kotekzot rephrased it:

I'd like to get back to my original question now.

Yes, I know that the evidence isn't flawless, but I am convinced, by my prior belief and this evidence, to move on unless someone has solid counter-evidence. I note, for science, that it's possible that I got lucky and fluked on the skill checks.

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