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I'm following this tutorial that says I should connect to Minecraft on port 4711. As far as I know the Minecraft server operates at port 25565.

Who am I connecting to? The Minecraft client?

PS. It actually says on the net that the Minecraft client may use port 4711 to communicate. Is this turned off for Minecraft on the Mac? My firewall is off but port 4711 seems unpopulated.

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Port 4711 is the RaspberryJuice Spigot server plugin's port to interface with Python.

When starting the server (Spigot) make sure to look through the startup messages and check that it loaded RaspberryJuice properly. I was trying to connect to that port from Python IDLE ide and got Connection Refused.

Turned out I had an error "major.minor 52" and had to update Java to the latest version to get Spigot to load RaspberryJuice properly.

  • This doesn't sound like a normal Minecraft thing. This is not bad itself, but can you elaborate on your system (server, plugins, etc), so that others can more easily see if the RaspberryJuice plugin even applies to them? – MrLemon Nov 29 '15 at 10:19
  • Ok. Added more info so it's not that cryptic any more. – unom Nov 30 '15 at 21:03
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This was initially confusing for me as well. When I enter python code and create the minecraft world initial object mc to connect to, I did not know whether python connects to localhost minecraft client which then handles the connection with minecraft server, or is it that python directly connects to the server on LAN and talks to raspberryjuice plugin there. It seems the latter is the case and therefore code like this works:

mc = minecraft.Minecraft.create("192.168.1.18")

Where address needs to be whatever address is assigned to you local LAN server. you can also put in port in this initial command, but the defaults are:

def create(address = "localhost", port = 4711)

So the default port 4711 is already there and therefore you only need to specify address. Port you would specify only if you had set your server to run on different than default port.

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