7

Does the semicircular potential CP bar scale linearly? At my current level, if the bar scales linearly, this Fearow's CP would cap around 500. This is significantly lower than my highest CP Pokémon, and therefore I wouldn't bother trying to upgrade it.

260CP Fearow

Edit

I'm not asking what the bar represents; I understand that it represents the Pokémon's overall potential CP at my current level. What I'm attempting to determine if this bar scales linearly or not. Understanding how the bar scales could help to project the potential CP of a Pokémon to determine if it's worth the effort of upgrading it or if it will cap before it surpasses the CP of other Pokémon you already have.

  • 5
    Not a duplicate. I know what the bar represents. I want to know if there's more information that can be inferred from the bar than just "am I close to the potential cap at my level?" I would like to know if it's possible to estimate what the capped CP would be, and in order to know that, I need to know if the bar is linear or not. – Taylor Lopez Jul 13 '16 at 16:26
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The semicircular bar behind a Pokemon is, in fact, linear.

The lower end of the bar represents some (still unknown) value dependent on the family of Pokemon, and the upper end of the bar represents that Pokemon's current CP cap at your level.

I went ahead and proved the linearality of the semicircle using GIMP. You may see the results here. Note that there may be some error in the numbers due to inaccuracy of my tests (things may not have been lined up quite right).

(source)

  • But what's your proof that it's linear? You've stated that it represents potential, and fills from left to right, and I know that. – Taylor Lopez Jul 13 '16 at 16:33
  • Take a protractor and confirm it for yourself if you want authoritative proof. I've found nothing to prove that it isn't linear. – Kaz Wolfe Jul 13 '16 at 16:34
  • I posted the question with the hopes that someone had already DONE the legwork of using a protractor to determine the scale of the meter. No sense in reinventing the wheel if it's already been done. – Taylor Lopez Jul 13 '16 at 16:56
  • @iAmMortos Edited. – Kaz Wolfe Jul 13 '16 at 17:41
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I don't think it's entirely linear. I hatched a snorlax with 495 CP and the bar was slightly over half full which would mean it wouldn't reach 1000. However, it's at 1073 now and it still has more room on the bar. I think it'll max out at around 1200-1300. Hopefully this helps. I was thinking the same thing as you in terms of deciding what's worth powering up based on its potential and the bar.

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    But, between checking the bar the first time, and filling the bar up, did your trainer level up? – Taylor Lopez Jul 22 '16 at 17:37
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Are you asking that: if now you have a pokemon and its curve is right in the middle (most top position) then is its CP at the end of the curve (most right/fully developed without pokemon trainer leveling) double from that?

That is what I understand linearly growing number is. And if you meant it then the answer is no. You can check it using any pokemon in http://poke.isitin.org/ and first setting the curve in the middle, then dragging the curve to the most developed right. If linear, the pokemon fully developed should have double the CP than the one that has a curve in the midpoint.

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I've noted that the potential cp levels rise as you reach another the next level. For example, I had a Fearow maxed out to five hundred something and after leveling up I went back and there was much more room to process.

  • 1
    Yeah, but that doesn't answer the question. – Frank Aug 26 '16 at 2:56
  • Welcome to Stack Exchange, Nagol19. This site is for questions and answers! A user posts a questions, and the responses are all attempted answers to that question. If you have something to add that isn't an answer, with enough reputation, you can add a comment rather than adding an answer. Hope you find these sites to be helpful and that you become a contributing member to our community! – Taylor Lopez Aug 26 '16 at 16:32

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