2

As above, error occurs randomly and prevents you from logging in to your Steam account.
Here the catch; I already found (sketchy) solution that works - therefore, following Stack Overflow customs I'm going to post it and accept it. Others are free to contribute.

Following solutions does not work:

  1. Rebooting computer.
  2. Removing any .blob files from Steam folder.
  3. Disabling/removing antivirus software.
  4. Reinstalling Steam.
3
  1. Disable Steam startup on boot.
  2. Add -tcp to the Steam link pointing to Steam starting location - it should look like this:

    "C:\Program Files (x86)\Steam\Steam.exe" -tcp

  3. Start Steam using said link. It will fail to connect to Steam network.

  4. Ignore it and press retry option. After a few seconds you'll be logged in normally.

Q: Why?
A: Ask Valve.

Q: Is it safe?
A: I do not guarantee anything but it works for me. Source (https://www.reddit.com/r/Steam/comments/2vaf5h/could_not_connect_to_steam_network/) says that:

It just launches steam with TCP protocols instead UCP.

and

It uses TCP as apposed to UDP. You can google if you are interested. There is no concerns about security.

2
  • It appears that issue with connecting to Steam was temporary; it's also worth noting that server status should be checked beforehand (if Steam is offline this solution won't work) - you can search "steam server status" or visit steamstat.us (no guarantees that site is OK when you read this! This is not official site!)
    – Hekkaryk
    May 22 '17 at 21:44
  • For the less technically inclined: Steam normally uses UDP, which is an internet protocol that just sends data without caring whether it arrives or in what order it arrives. It's good for connections where speed and throughput is important, like downloads and gaming, which is essentially what Steam handles. TCP is an internet protocol aimed at reliability. there is a lot of extra overhead and error handling involved, but it's good for when you need to be certain that your communication arrives at the correct destination, barring network issues.
    – Nzall
    May 24 '17 at 10:42

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