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Emulators like epsxe and pcsx2 use the original disc data. How come X1 can't do the same? Why does it need to download an "emulator compatible version"?

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  • If you're talking about Rare Replay, it's because the disk isn't large enough to contain the data for all Xbox 360 games it includes.
    – Nolonar
    Jan 7 '18 at 12:24
  • Or... why you you need Jython and Cython if youre going to code cross platform with Python. There needs to be an interpreter. Dropping the file from the game disc is one language structure. The console expects a different one. The emulator interprets one for the other so it can be executed. If it was a direct read, it would be inefficient, whether you completely understand the mechanic or not. Jan 7 '18 at 14:28
  • @ShawnGordon But isn't that what an emulator is supposed to do, work with the old language structure? They even said that the backwards compatibility emulator basically emulates a 360 layer on X1 and makes the game think that it's running on a real 360.
    – eddman
    Jan 7 '18 at 14:42
  • You just answered your question Jan 7 '18 at 14:44
  • @ShawnGordon I'm confused. Ok, then how come an emulator like pcsx2 on my PC is able to read PS2 discs and work with the original language structure of PS2 games without any modifications?
    – eddman
    Jan 7 '18 at 14:46
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It's a pretty difficult answer to explain in full-on technical detail without putting someone to sleep, but a rather simple answer at the same time: the reason seems to be a mixture of the technology used in XBONE vs XB360 is very different, so rather than manufacture and include the hardware to read the disc directly, its simpler and more efficient in design as well as overcome some of the licensing issues that would impede delivery, to emulate older hardware with the newer one.

Reading the code from disc means the data has to be read, parsed, converted, re-parsed, and then executed. Emulation is preconverted because it's just a complex set of "if x = y, then Z, while x is y" and from there, x is whatever it needs to be in that instance and can be expanded or improved upon over time. A direct read, isnt going to do that, especially with sound and graphics handling.

Emulation isnt new on consoles. The PS3 originally had hardware to run previous model games, and then switched over to pure software emulation. Though PS3 didn't require downloading PS1 or PS2 discs and had short loading times, the conversions were on the fly and sometimes suffered in quality. I'm far from an MS fanboy, but would assert a preload (completely doable on something with the power of an XBONE for XB360) overcomes a quality issue when emulating on the fly from disc in that MS can simply drop a ln update to the emulator instead of having to change the hardware for better performance down the road.

It just implies the HDD reads all game assets from the drive and has faster access instead of relying on the spin up and read speed of physical media, and from there MS can wrap the emulated output in a way that makes the experience better overall (from a developer POV).

IGN has a lengthy writeup from interviewing some of the MS engineers back in October of 2017

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  • That's not what I meant. My mistake. I edited the question to make it clear.
    – eddman
    Jan 7 '18 at 13:54
  • The answer is basically the same. It needs an emulator because the XBONE and XB360 are different architectures. Youre going to have faster access and read speeds direct from the drive instead of disc. Jan 7 '18 at 13:59
  • I know it needs an emulator, but why does it have to download another version? Why not use the original data, like all other emulators do? Is the downloaded version different from the original version? If so, why?
    – eddman
    Jan 7 '18 at 14:10
  • I thought I answered that in my response. Jan 7 '18 at 14:15
  • "... the reason seems to be a mixture of the technology used in XBONE vs XB360 is very different, so rather than manufacture and include the hardware to read the disc directly, its simpler and more efficient in design as well as overcome some of the licensing issues that would impede delivery, to emulate older hardware with the newer one." Jan 7 '18 at 14:16

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