4

Say I have 3 machines connected to the same network, M1, M2 and M3. I want to do the following:

  • Run a SNES emulator on M1
  • Setup M2 so that it can control player 1 on the emulator running on M1 via keyboard (e.g. by executing a connectToEmulator binary)
  • Setup M3 so that it can control player 2 on the emulator running on M1 via keyboard (e.g. by executing a connectToEmulator binary)

Something like:

    +---------------+
    |       M1      |
    |               |
    | SNES Emulator |
    +---------------+
     ^             ^
     |             |
+----------+    +----------+
|    M2    |    |    M3    |
|          |    |          |
| Player 1 |    | Player 2 |
+----------+    +----------+

Is there an easy way to accomplish this?

3
  • 1
    You should look into a network KVM like Synergy. You could bind different controls for p1 and p2 on the keyboard, and configure the remote PCs to fire those buttons on the networked system. – Ivo Coumans Sep 28 '18 at 9:24
  • 1
    I think some emulators might be able to do this out-of-the-box. Which emulator are you using? Or are you open to suggestions? – Philipp Sep 28 '18 at 10:44
  • I'm not using any particular emulator. Anything that runs on a raspberry pi would be fine! – Gabriel Huff Sep 28 '18 at 13:21
1

Parsec seems to accomplish what you want through streaming video and allowing for control passthrough.

Parsec is typically used to stream and play a couch co-op PC game that doesn't support network play. It streams the video to anyone who connects to the computer while allowing remote computers to use their controllers and keyboards. It works with any application on your computer, including emulators.

You'll want to host Parsec on M1 and have M2 and M3 connect to it. You'll have the option to enable keyboards or controllers for each client that connects. Once you're connected, you should be able to stream your emulator from M1 and control it from M2 or M3. As a bonus, this is not restricted to just working on your local network.

Since this is streaming video over the network, it's more resource intensive than if an emulator has network play features built in, but this is a guaranteed way to have this multiplayer support on your emulator if it's missing support.

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