10

Is there an app to grant or deny access to my child's account, or control the schedule?

Now, I do everything online, I just wish there was an app for that.

  • 1
    @galacticninja I dont think your edit is valid - This is NOT a case of an xy problem. The OP is clearly already fully aware of the family group settings and the method of use while accessing the console. - They were asking if there was an app for the phone which allowed them to alter the settings. As there is a single Microsoft app which allows this I also don't see it as a recommendation request. – EdHunter Jan 7 at 13:59
  • @EdHunter "The OP is clearly already fully aware of the family group settings and the method of use while accessing the console." Actually, this was NOT clear as OP didn't include this information in the question, but in a comment to an answer, and I didn't see that at the time of review. As per OP's comment, I will revert my edit, and vote to CLOSE as a recommendation question. It is now apparent that they were actually asking for an app recommendation. – galacticninja Jan 8 at 4:50
18

You don't need to install an application for managing the playtime of your child, you just need to add him to your Microsoft Family as a child and change the playtime from your account.

First, you need to add him onto your Microsoft Family. From "Add members to your family group":

The way you add someone to your family group on Xbox One depends on whether they’re new to Xbox Live or already have an Xbox Live account. For kids who are new to Xbox Live, add them to your family group on the console, then manage their family settings on family.microsoft.com. Otherwise, they may not appear in your list of family members on the console.

If your child doesn’t have an Xbox Live account:

  1. Press the Xbox button to open the guide, then select Sign in and sign in with your account.
  2. Press the Xbox button again and select System > Settings > Account > Family settings > Manage family members > Add to family > Add new.
  3. When the person you want to add is prompted to sign in using their Microsoft account email address, press B on your controller, then move the left stick down to select Get a new account, and have them follow the steps to create a Microsoft account.
  4. When you’re prompted, select Add to family.

If your child has an Xbox Live account on your console:

  1. Press the Xbox button to open the guide, then select Sign in and sign in with your account.
  2. Press the Xbox button again and select System > Settings > Account > Family settings > Manage family members > Add to family.
  3. Select the profile for the person you want to add, then press the A button on your controller.

If your child has an Xbox Live account that’s not on your console:

  1. Press the Xbox button to open the guide, then select Sign in and sign in with your account.
  2. Press the Xbox button again and select System > Settings > Account > Family settings > Manage family members > Add to family > Add new.
  3. Have the person you want to add sign in with their Microsoft account email address and password, and when you’re prompted, select Add to family.

After adding the child account to your family, you can change the playtime from the Microsoft Family page. From "Set up screen time limits for your child ":

To set screen time limits for your child on Xbox One and Windows 10 devices, go to your family group and sign in with your Microsoft account. Then:

  1. Find your child's name and select Screen time.
  2. If you want to use the same schedule for all devices, turn on Use one schedule for all devices.
  3. If you’d rather manage the schedules separately, scroll down and switch On or Off individually for Xbox One and Windows 10. If you don’t want screen limits at all, turn the same option Off.
  4. If you want to give them the full amount of time you’ve scheduled, leave the default setting of Max scheduled. For example, if you’ve allowed screen time from 8 am to 8 pm, they could use their devices that entire time.
  5. If you don’t want the default Max scheduled, select the row for each day to set how much time and when you allow your child to spend with their devices.
  6. Type in your schedule choices, select Add and then select Save.
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    I did that. My point is that when my child might want some extra time, it would be much easier to manage or change the schedule via an app – Jack Jan 7 at 7:00
  • You need to create a passkey for your account then. From the page: "A passkey protects against a child signing in as the parent and overriding parental controls" – Lemon Jan 7 at 10:10
  • @Lemon Not sure how creating a passkey makes it easier for the OP to alter schedule, also where does he state that the child is overriding the already setup controls? – EdHunter Jan 7 at 13:55
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    Oh sorry, I ended up reading that wrong. You can just add a bookmark on your phone browser to change the schedule. On Chrome for Android, you can add specific web pages on your homepage for quick access. – Lemon Jan 7 at 13:57
0

I have not used this app so I have no idea how easy it is to use,

If you use a phone which runs Android;

Microsoft launcher for Android

As long as the child is part of your 'Microsoft Family' then you should be able to control screentime from the app.

If you do not use Android then it appears you will be unable to do what you want.

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  • Would the downvoter care to explain why they think this is not a good answer. - As per the OP's comments on Lemon's post 'it would be much easier to manage or change the schedule via an app' - This answer addresses that and as such is a valid CORRECT answer – EdHunter Jan 7 at 13:54
-1

The xbox app has a Family Settings section in it. That's probably exactly what you're asking for.

Family Settings

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  • Can you go into more detail about where to go and what to do in the Family Settings? – Robbie Jan 7 at 16:05
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    @Wondercricket Lemon's answer doesn't seem to mention an app at all, which as the OP commented on on that answer, seems to be their actual question. – mbrig Jan 7 at 16:18
  • @Robbie, sorry I don't know much more than that. When I tap it, it wants me to set up a family in order to progress. This was just to answer the original question of "is there an app for that?". – Ian MacDonald Jan 7 at 16:19
  • @mbrig Ah, I see the differences now. Just skimming over them, they appeared similar to me. My mistake – Wondercricket Jan 7 at 16:20

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