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The server has around 10-20 players, 50 peak. In just a month the size of the server (world) went up with 250GB. Is it possible, or is it something else?

Theoretically a chunk should only take up about ~1.2MB (150*16*16*256) and if that's the case, it can't be the world? Is Minecraft world saving just badly optimized?

EDIT: To clarify, I'm not the owner and can't verify it's specifically the world, but the server runs on paper and has a few plugins.

EDIT 2: Fixed calculation

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  • Are you calculating one bit per block? Then there could only ever be two different types of blocks, like air and stone. But there are hundreds of types, block states, NBT data, also entities and so on. Apr 10 '20 at 15:00
  • I recommend running a tool like QDirStat/WinDirStat/K4DirStat/whatever you can get on your system on the folder, that quickly tells you what takes up the majority of the space. Apr 10 '20 at 15:01
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It's realistic but not likely. A player on an End raid hunting only for elytra can generate 250MB of data per hour, and afking in a flying machine may produce some 5GB per day, but 250GB for 20-30 players in a month would normally either require organized effort to bloat the save, or a malicious user mass-producing save-bloating items (like copies of written book filled with random UTF-16 characters, stored in a way that prevents good compression). The most plausible reason is some buggy plugin/mod/datapack generating obscene amount of logs or other data.

To wit, Hermitcraft 6, an extremely well developed server of ~18 players after a year and a half of playing - but with chunks the players either never visited (just saw from afar) or spent less than 2 seconds in (flew over on Elytra) removed, is 2.4GB. 2b2t, the oldest anarchy server, after nine years and and over 450,000 players visiting at least once, was 7.4 TB.

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