54

First, usurp his liege's title. This will cause him to become independent and, more importantly, gives you a de jure claim on his county. Press the de jure claim. You need to do this instead of holy warring because holy war will only take his title (and he'll move to another court). When you win, you'll vassalise him. Revoke his title. Hopefully, since he ...


41

There are 3 viable options: Disqualify him from inheritance/holding titles, by making him a monk. Change your succession laws, so the oldest child can't inherit (Elective, Elective Gavelkind, Ultimogeniture, Seniority. Kill (Imprison/Execute) him or blind/castrate him (If Greek) You could also give titles to your prefered son, so you won't trigger an ...


40

It's usually fine, especially if you have a succession law which lets you control who inherits, such as elective. Children with the inbred trait are relatively rare (Zoroastrians are less likely to get the trait) and they often die anyway. For the best of both worlds, marry your sister for the opinion and piety and take concubines (ideally with good traits)...


37

I was once in a similar situation. Even if you could imprison and even banish your son, he would still be your heir. You could execute him, but I've found it to be an unpreferable choice due to the penalties (-10 Opinion from all vassals, -20 Piety). It's possible, but there are no guarantees for success. Here's a few things you can do: If your king is old,...


34

In the best possible case, this would be the progression: Your grandmother, Alice, marries Bob at the age of 16 (minimum age) and has a child, Charlie, when she turns 17 say. Charlie marries at 16 and has a child at 17, you. At this time your grandmother Alice is 34 years old. By the time you turn 16, your grandmother will have turned 50. The game makes ...


29

No, it shouldn't. In case of bastards, the game records the real fatherhood behind the curtain, and calculates the risk of inbreeding by the genetic family ties. Example character: birth_name="Aghsartan" birth_date="1214.2.3" father=582283 real_father=568231 mother=583069 That also means, that you can inadvertently ...


28

The Papacy itself will always exist and be held by the Pope. If he loses Rome he just moves to somewhere else. However, just because you can't rid the world of him doesn't mean you can't reduce his faith to a mere footnote in history. Capturing Rome is a nice start to crippling Catholicism from the outside, but if you really want to feel like you're doing ...


25

Correction years later. It turns out there are two separate, different mechanics both labeled divine marriage in the game. The first is applied to a religion, and only carries an opinion and piety bonus, e.g. the Zoroastrians in vanilla. The second is applied to dynasties, and carries the other mechanics discussed below. This is not used in the vanilla ...


24

Yes. The marriage lasts until death do you part. So either you encourage the death part, or if you are good friends with the Pope (or your preferred religious head), you can ask for him to annul the marriage ... however since you are Cathar, that is not an option. This is a historically correct depiction of royal marriages in medieval Europe. Lots of ...


19

If you extend the definition to anyone who is your biological relative and also your grandmother by law, this becomes possible. If your dad marries a woman, has two children, you and one girl, then divorces her and marries the child while you marry your mother, your sister becomes your step mother, and her mother is your step grandmother, as well as your ...


18

It's worth noting that when the child is born your son will mistakenly believe it is his and act accordingly. However there is a 'The husband suspects something ain't right' 'On-action event: Pregnancy in matrimony, with another father!' 'The father's wife is angered' events. So there is still plenty of ways this can go wrong and ruin your relationship ...


17

Upon playing further, Tolir took until the ripe old age of 77 to pass. Hrane (now 48) has returned to claim the throne of Norway, along with a pleasant surprise: Hrane now has a nice starting prestige of 279 (+200) and a bump of the royal coffers by 200 as well. Be aware, I was prompted that being a member of the Varangian Guard is dangerous, so I'm ...


16

There is no one-best-recipe. Your vassals should never have too many titles - in this case they will have power to singlehandedly overthrow you and usurp your title or make you to lower crown authority or taxes or levy size. And be sure - there will be time when they want it. Also don't give titles to someone who hates you - in this case make them your ...


16

On your first question: disinheriting your heir is not possible unless you have elective succession. Then you change for example choose to elect your second or third son. Most of the time your vassals will elect the person you elect. Off course there is a chance they will elect someone else, so it's tricky. On your second question: yes, it is possible. I ...


16

I think it's more of a good idea in CK2 than in real life. Unless you're playing moralistically you can easily have more than one kid. Just make sure that the kid that inherits isn't the one with the inbred. Kill any of your children that are... defective.


15

I've been in the same situation. I solved it by excommunicating the aggressor which gave me the ability to imprison him with causing tyrany. If the pope doesn't like the agressor and you have 100 piety, this might be a solution for you.


15

The game mechanics have an internal awareness of who the actual father was, this enables in game events to be triggered such as: "I am a bastard" "The father's wife is angered" and my personal favourite: "I'm not your son. I'm your brother" So IF the father is of a different family and you marry him off to a relative then there will be no risk of ...


14

It gives you prestige Makes it easier to handle your kingdom (controlling 60 count vassals is harder than controlling 20 duke vassals) Allows your vassals to expand on their own (i.e. if your duke owns 2 of 3 counties in a duchy, you can press the claim on your own, or you can let him do it himself. Dukes are more likely to make improvements on their own (...


14

There are a couple of things that make conquering a kingdom hard. Getting a casus belli (cb). The truce waiting period. (You can break a truce, but the penalty is harsh) Ways to literally invade the entire kingdom at once As mentioned by svick, if you are an emperor, you can press a claim on the kingdom title for a relative or vassal, and upon winning, ...


14

Finding out why they hate you To find out why people don't like you, hover over the opinion number to find out why: (alas, the cursor isn't showing in this screenshot. I assure you, it's hovering over the number.) You can find out why people don't like you from any screen that shows their opinion number. Here's another example: Doing something about them ...


14

You have two major options here, and one is much easier than the other: Take a title, release him, let him rebel, imprison him, rinse, repeat. Eventually, you've taken so many titles that he isn't a Super-Duke anymore, and when you finally take his last title, he won't even be a noble anymore. This may take a very long time; probably so long that your Duke ...


13

As World Engineeer explains, your liege has a right to a certain amount of your levies. Whatever remains, are your personal levies, to use as you please. However, it is still somewhat possible to give your liege or even just a chosen ally control over your personal levies. Gather round, and I'll tell you how. Raise the amount of levies you wish to waste ...


13

From the May 26th Dev Diary: First, regions isn't something that is going to affect you directly but it works somewhat like how it have done in the Europa Universalis Games. It's an area on the map that denotes a region with a name and it's mostly used to improve on our localization of things, such as hunting for tigers in India or hunting a deer in ...


12

Go to the Intrigue screen, then look at the Threats tab at the bottom. This gives you a list of nobles, along with the odds of their rebelling per year. You want these numbers to be as low as possible, of course! Mouse over the "rebellion chance" to see why they're rebelling. The usual cause is a low opinion of you, but other factors can come in, like their ...


12

There are a variety of ways to go to war. When you declare war, read the Casus Belli very carefully. It turns out that while the Medieval and Renaissance eras didn't have a United Nations or equivalent, they did have to deal with similar fallout: if you went to war because you're a warmongering monster bent on conquering the world, the countries near you ...


12

Problem: once you die, your sons will split up your lands. Since you have more than one top-level title (duchy, in this case), your multiple sons will split into multiple independent realms. Solution 1: MURDER. You have too many sons. Make terrible things happen to all but one of your sons. Cross your fingers and hope your sole surviving son doesn't die ...


12

Craven, Slothful, Gluttonous, Content AND a lowest-rank education trait. I can scarcely imagine a worse heir without adding bad congenital traits... Your heir cannot be intentionally removed from the line of succession by making him a bishop. As you have discovered you cannot plot against your offspring without Mods. Such mods DO exist though, so there's ...


11

ways I do that (legally): Really mistreat someone (like your wife), hopefully they'll start a plot to kill you. Put yourself in every battle you do, try to lose them ;) In a more 'cheaty' way, you probably can load the game as one of your counts/dukes and select the plot to kill the liege :) then go back to yourself and wait until they succeed


11

The game almost certainly told you that the county must be independent before you can declare war, not that is is independent. A county inside Scotland can't be independent. To press a claim on a county that is part of a larger foreign realm, you must declare war on the top title-holder: in this case, you have to declare war on the King of Scotland in order ...


11

No, that law applies only to your vassals. Until you have castle vassals, the effect of that law will be nothing. You already receive the full income of your castle holdings anyway, so there's nothing to increase. However, now is a good time to change your feudal tax laws to what you will want them to be once you start having feudal vassals, since you don't ...


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