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I built a gigantic complex circuit that converted signal strength to time using comparator fadeout and then back to signal strength using locking repeaters, then I built a simpler circuit based on Xisuma's item frame rotation detector, which was still quite bulky and complicated looking… and then I had an epiphany and just used a bit of redstone dust. This ...


8

Something like this? It can be powered and extended until the redstone limit.


6

What about this? When you make your input two units stronger, your output increases by one. Edit: This is rather slow, because it takes up to 8 ticks (one for the last repeater plus one for each of the following comparators) to update the output. Inspired by Fabian Rölling's faster (only one tick) solution, I found out that lining up the repeater's ...


6

This is impossible, because of the bug MC-108 (currently closed as "working as intended", but the proper resolution would be "won't fix"). A dropper always activates when the position above it is powered and it gets a block updates (which it always gets from the state of the hopper changing). You need to work around it, for example by keeping the dropper ...


4

For delays of order of 30 seconds to 4 minutes the Etho Clock is the optimal solution. You fine-tune the time by changing the number of items in the hopper, one item corresponding to 0.8s. If you want just delay instead of cyclic operation, you can use this in pulse extender variant - one of the pistons sticky, one normal (the clock variant uses both sticky ...


4

Your piston is not receiving direct redstone power: Notice how the redstone wire is pointed away from the piston. In order to power that piston, you'll need to either power a block directly adjacent to the piston, or loop your wire around slightly so that it points directly at the piston. One thing you can do is bring that wire up 1 block: place a block ...


4

Answering the first part of that question: An overflow protection means either an addition to a storage-related circuit or a modification to it, which makes that circuit not misbehave when you either dump too much into it at once or put in too much in total. For example this is the basic classic item sorter: And this is the overflow protected version of ...


4

Power the dispenser indirectly with a block so that it can't power the hopper.


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Here it is the system: And here it is, missing one layer: I made it so you could loop it and repeat as many times you want. Dark blocks need to not be a transparent block (such as glass or slabs) and need to be there (cannot be missing), light ones can be either and quartz do not matter. There is nothing under the torches that are close to the Lamps. ...


3

A comparator has 2 modes Compare mode (torch unlit): Check if the signal coming in from the back is greater than or equal to the signal strongest signal from either side. If yes, emit the power of the back side to the front side If no, emit no power to the front Subtract mode (torch lit): Check if the signal coming in from the back is greater than or ...


3

By routing the output of the flip-flop to a piston that connects a torch to the circuit breaker this bug can be circumvented:


3

Let a minecart fall through one or several cobwebs. Falling through a single cobweb takes about 25 seconds. A circular track let you loop. A detector rail let you activate a redstone signal.


3

No, dispenser nor droppers can plant seeds. However, as an alternative you can put a villager farmer there and he will automatically plant seeds.


3

The problem of generating many short pulses can be broken down into generating one long pulse and then letting a clock run as long as that pulse is active. Having a clock running as long as an input is active is easy, it's the classic comparator clock. And how to generate a long pulse easily? Whenever long times are involved, hopper timers are always the ...


3

one thing that you could do would be to place a hopper under the chest leading into another double chest, or you could have a overflow protection device that burns/destroys extra items, to have the chest system vertically you could have chests like this:


3

You may be able to block off access to the observer by placing blocks around it without activating it. This way, as long as they can't break blocks, they can't reach the observer and won't be able to get in. All you have to do is break a block or two and activate the observer to open the door. Sorry if my answer doesn't work/doesn't make sense, I don't use ...


3

If I understand you right, you want an "ABBA circuit": When you turn the input on, first A turns on and then B, when you turn the input off, first B turns off and then A. The Minecraft wiki lists multiple designs for those here: https://minecraft.gamepedia.com/Mechanics/Redstone/Miscellaneous_circuits#ABBA_circuit (archive) More can be found online. An ...


3

With commands it's easy: /scoreboard objectives add leave custom:leaveGame This ticks up once for every time you leave the world, so it can be detected on the next server tick (when you have joined again). I do not know how it behaves when Minecraft is killed or crashes. Example usage: /execute if entity @a[scores={leave=1..}] run say The world was ...


3

This circuit can be used to get an output every 1, 2, 3, … up to 320 inputs, depending on how many items you put into the dropper: The dropper points into the hopper and the hopper into the dropper. Here is a structure file: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1471ikFq5PrcBcpdfpolioXI3gfxvwt3t This circuit is actually much more complex than it looks: When you ...


3

It's impossible not to power the dropper, but it's possible not to make it fire. All you need is not to provide a block update, which would make the dropper check for power and activate. This example setup works - a solid block does not produce updates even when powered, locking a hopper does not produce an update, and a repeater will produce an update 2 ...


3

When the lever is turned on, the piston pushes the block out of the way of the wire, letting it sneak under the piston arm. When the lever is turned off, the piston pulls the block back in the way of the redstone wire, and it stops working. The concept is based on a simple AND gate, where the output is only on if both inputs are on. Like this: For the ...


3

You can use observer chain to conduct the signal, and observers watching the chain to generate the pulses. You'll also need some sort of clock on the input to generate startup pulses. The chain can be branching and twisting, just remember the next observer must be watching (face side into) the previous in the chain. Note if you power a lamp directly from ...


2

Here is my own take on this, including more reasons and more "best practices". Why should you only use command blocks or functions, not redstone? Firstly, you don't need to use redstone. Once you know how to do things the "proper" way, it's actually usually easier to do everything like that. As a basic example, writing execute if entity @e[type=sheep] run ...


2

What about an ender pearl launcher with a piece of string at the desired height to stop it? Throw your ender pearl in and activate your elytra when you get teleported to the string.


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What I've found is that the sorters work best if you keep the placeholder blocks at 1 per slot, and increase the item you want to sort up to 41. With the setup you're using, the redstone signal coming from the comparator can easily increase past the amount needed to open the hopper below. This makes it so that the hoppers on either side will open, ...


2

Try the circuit given below (attach to the output of the XOR gate). You can adjust the delay using the repeater connected to the sticky piston. The component behind the moving block is a comparator. It worked for me on 1.14.4 Without the other repeater, a pulse would leak out when the piston is pulling back the block.


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