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81

Tearing occurs when the graphics card's buffer is sent to the monitor while that same buffer is being changed. You still get tearing even if the FPS is limited to the refresh rate of the monitor because those things aren't locked together without vertical sync enabled. Think of it like you're in a classroom, where the teacher is writing notes on the board. ...


64

V-Sync is short for "Vertical Synchronization"; its only purpose is to avoid screen tearing in games. What is screen tearing? Image by Vanessaezekowitz, via Wikimedia Commons. Used under the CC-By-SA 3.0 license. Screen tearing happens, because your GPU sends a frame to your screen when the latter hasn't yet finished displaying its previous frame. You are ...


51

I disagree with both of the contributed answers to this question. They are right but for the wrong reasons. I believe LCDs don't work because of a technical limitation, but this talk about electron beams and "retrace lines" doesn't make sense to someone who understands the technology: a properly contrasted white box is all the light gun looks for. The photo-...


35

I may have a solution/workaround if you're using windows 8.1: Make your "secondary" (the one you want the game to display the game on) as primary. Right-click your taskbar and unlock it. Drag and drop your "primary" taskbar (The one with the clock) to your now secondary monitor (the one you don't want the game to be displayed on) Right-click your taskbar ...


32

The original SNES, while certainly one of the pinnacles of the 16-bit era, doesn't come without it's issues. You might find that original hardware will be harder to wrangle, especially 30 years later when we're talking about second-hand consoles in unknown states of disrepair, analog AV inputs disappearing off modern displays, and proper upscaling solutions ...


30

A solution I am using involves Steam. Install Steam and start it up in Big Picture mode, under display settings, select the monitor you want to play the game on. By doing this steam changes the windows primary display temporarily until you leave big picture mode. You can add non steam games to your steam library as shortcuts so you can launch any game(or any ...


30

A 144 Hz monitor would have a refresh period of 7 ms, and a response time of...whatever, doesn't matter. Typical human reaction time is in the range of a few hundred milliseconds, depending on the task, so reducing frame updates from 16 ms (60 Hz monitor) to 7 ms is not that great, a 5% savings assuming best-case. Here's a colorful plot from the paper ...


18

According to the online user guide, there is an apparent way to circumvent the PS3's shutdown: Even when [On] is selected, this feature (HDMI Control) may not be available in the following cases: When using certain features of the PS3™ system, such as gameplay or video playback. When the PS3™ system is not selected as the input source for ...


18

One option is to switching your machine to "projector only" mode. Hit "windows key" + P and select projector only mode. This will treat your machine as having only one monitor (in this case, the secondary monitor). You won't see any more output on your laptop screen, but you will be able to play the game fullscreen on your secondary monitor without ...


16

Because even if your fps is the same as refresh rate of the monitor, it doesn't mean the frames are synchronized with the refresh rate. Screen tearing can happen at any fps, if vsync is off.


13

There are a variety of computer cards called TV Tuner Cards, many of which include TV Capture functionality - older ones often have the Cable or Composite-In you'll require (this is how I played Majora's Mask the first time). TV Tuner/Capture Card (Red/White audio leads are meant to be combined and go through the 3.5mm jack). There are also apparently ...


12

The Nintendo 64 (along with the GameCube and the Super Nintendo, who share a common AV connector) outputs signals in a format called "Composite Video." Composite is an old analog standard for video output. With the addition of something called a "RF Modulator" (also known as a "RF switch") these composite video signals can be received by televisions that ...


12

Game mode is a setting on your TV that compensates for input lag mainly. you can read This article for more information about it, but basically it tweaks the TV (usually by turning features off) so it can meet the requirements of the game. Try it for yourself, watch TV with game mode on and off. you might see a few subtle differences in quality (color, ...


11

This only happens if you run a game in full screen mode. If you go to options => graphics in this particular game and turn the display to windowed / borderless, it'll solve your problem. Then the game will stay open in the background, while you can manage other programs (e.g. Chrome) and turn back to the game afterwards. Note that if you use your mouse ...


10

There are four main components to this question: Fluidity of motion: Try turning in any first person shooter. The difference between 60hz and 144hz is easily perceptible. So getting a 144hz vs 60hz monitor will definitely improve this. Having a more fluid image definitely helps with aiming. Clarity of motion: This has two components, depending on what ...


10

Unfortunately the answer is going to be the same. Your Macbook may have an HDMI port, but it's an HDMI Output, not an Input. The monitor is connected internally, so you don't have direct access to the monitor's inputs. This is the way laptops (and iMacs) are designed. The HDMI port you mentioned is for multi-monitor setups or for outputting to a projector - ...


9

I was able to find an answer to this question here. Basically, the HDMI handshake doesn't work correctly between some TVs and the Xbox. The TV tells the Xbox to only allow PC-like display options if it's set to auto-detect the display settings. To fix this: Open the options on the Xbox Main Screen Right until you get to Settings Select Console Settings → ...


9

OK, I'm going to set the record straight here since I know quite a bit about this topic. ;) Modern advertising has confused the masses in regards to Hz.. so here it goes. All consumer grade HDTVs (that I have seen so far) do not accept greater than a 60HZ input - meaning - that 60fps is the highest framerate you can achieve on a modern HDTV with vSync ...


8

Is your "main" monitor on the left side? I have a 3 monitor setup with the main monitor in the middle and have noticed that my left screen is fine and dandy even when the middle screen has a superlow resolution, but the right screen is doomed to a life of weirdness (the right screen hence gets the least use and is often used for console games instead of PC ...


7

There's no good way to do this. iMacs do not have any sort of Video Input. While you could use an external Video In adapter that connects to Firewire or USB, such as ElGato's EyeTV, the latency introduced makes these devices singularly unsuited for any sort of gameplay.


7

To be able to use a 3D TV for computer gaming you need the following items: 3D TV. 3D Glasses. A HDMI 1.4a cable. A graphics card able to transmit 3D images. It is very important that you use a HDMI 1.4 or 1.4a cable, because earlier versions of the cable cannot transmit the frequencies needed for 3D. As for the graphics card in your computer, both AMD ...


7

This is what you see when you plug a composite video output (yellow cable) into a component video luminance input (green port). Put simply, a Yellow/Red/White cable does not connect to Green/Red/Blue ports because Yellow (Video) and Red/White (Audio) do not match the signals for Green/Red/Blue (all Video). (For a full explanation, read on; or for the fix, ...


7

It may not improve your reaction time, but I've heard from others in the Counter Strike 1.6 and Quake scenes that the animation is a lot smoother and more fluid. Apparently, this helps with scanning and aiming a lot. A lot of people even prefer CRT monitors because the refresh rate is higher on them. Have you noticed the difference in fluiditiy between ...


7

It is highly unlikely to accomplish this (though technically possible in theory). Computers generally only focus on one window or application at a time. The window that is active is the only one that receives input from the keyboard/mouse, and (almost always) the controller. This is why you can play a game in one monitor with a text editor open in the other ...


7

If you go into the Interface Options section of the Options menu, you should find this option right here: Flip it to either Fullscreen or Always, to suit your preference, and your mouse will no longer be free to wander to your other monitor.


7

I believe this might be a Windows 10 display scaling issue. Here's two things to try: Windows 10 has a display scaling feature. I think for high resolution monitors, it essentially "zooms" in. The display scaling is a setting unique to each monitor. To change it: Right click on the desktop and select Display Settings Select the monitor that needs to be ...


6

Fullscreen games tend to be limited to the primary monitor (primary output). You can move windowed games to another monitors at some performance cost though. If you set the window to borderless, it will look just fine.


6

While I can't speak for FPS-type games, having a high refresh rate on your monitor is basically mandatory for fighting games like Street Fighter. Fighting games often have incredibly strict input requirements. For example, you may only have 1/60th of a second to input a particular command. The time that the screen takes to refresh is basically like time ...


6

Let's start with the easy one. Can the human eye actually tell the difference between 60hz and 144hz? Yes. It's one of these "you gotta see it for yourself" thing. 144hz looks crazy smooth. Even just moving the cursor around the screen is impressive at first. why is refresh rate considered important beyond 60hz? Well in the context of games, assuming ...


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