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87

I don't own a NES or know the reason for this message for certain, but from an electronics perspective the reason is fairly obvious. Yes, the reason is to prevent corruption of game saves but no, it is not because of "power spikes" or switch bouncing as mentioned in the other answer and comments. The first thing to know is that there is no such thing as an ...


83

After Googling for a while, I unfortunately couldn't turn up any specific answer. The only thing we know for certain, is that holding RESET was required for pretty much every game that offered a battery-backed saving mechanism, as opposed to password-based savegames. The answers I found included: Holding RESET allowed the NES to finish saving data before ...


51

I disagree with both of the contributed answers to this question. They are right but for the wrong reasons. I believe LCDs don't work because of a technical limitation, but this talk about electron beams and "retrace lines" doesn't make sense to someone who understands the technology: a properly contrasted white box is all the light gun looks for. The photo-...


43

http://creek.doorblog.jp/archives/51212263.html 元々バッテリバックアップを前提に作られていないファミコンでは、 バッテリバックアップの仕様上、電池やSRAMに通電している時に電源を切ると 電源ノイズが発生して電池からSRAMへの電力供給が不安定になったりする。結果データが一部書き換わってしまうことがある。 The Family Computer (NES) was not designed wtih SRAM backup in mind. Therefore, it was challenging to protect the SRAM from noise or fluctuation in power supply, which might ...


39

They are different ROM versions. The first release of the cartridge did not have such a notification. However, the first releases of the cartridge were particularly prone to losing a save file, or even all of the same files. Nintendo recognized that people may like this battery-powered feature to save games, and didn't want to get a bad reputation of ...


21

It's a light gun. It has a single light sensor in the tip, which picks up light from the part of the screen it is aimed at. Given that the CRT TVs used at the time essentially instantaneously displayed the signal sent from the console, this was quite sufficient. I've never used a Zapper myself, but according to the Wikipedia article, it worked as follows: ...


19

The NES Zapper is a simple photodiode connected to a switch. A photodiode allows current to pass, but only if there is light present. When you pull the trigger, the following happens in quick succession: The image of the game is replaced with a totally black screen The photodiode is checked to see if it is absorbing light. The entire screen is set to ...


15

According to Google Images' relatively new image-matching feature, which I fed the screenshot you provided to, apparently it's Disney's Adventures in the Magic Kingdom. Here's another gameplay video:


14

A is used to jump or swim up, whereas B is used to shoot a flame or run. If you're actually asking how one would use both buttons, I can at least tell you how I played it. I placed my thumb on the B and would press A with the joint: That's actually the way for most of the NES jump 'n runs. Source: I own a NES and the game ;).


13

The NES comes from the "8-bit era" of consoles, which included the NES and the Sega Master System. These consoles are based around 8-bit processors, which generally store and process data 8 bits at a time. In computer parlance, 8 bits make one byte. Many NES games have a limit of 255 on certain items (such as The Legend of Zelda's Rupee counter) because ...


11

There are a couple of tell-tale signs which actually seem common for just about all Nintendo, cartridge-based systems. Look for these qualities when attempting to identify counterfeit cartridges. Take a close look at the label. Is it blurry? It's probably a fake if it is. Most counterfeits use decent scans for reproduction labels, and the quality is more ...


10

The 10NES chip can be effectively disabled by cutting pin 4 on the chip. (The pins are numbered starting with the black dot as 1, and then continuing down the same side of the chip as the dot). I did this to my old NES and it worked fine. However, any hardware modification can be somewhat risky, so your mileage may vary. There's a picture of the chip ...


10

Yes, the red light should flash when no game is inserted. It also can do that when a game is in there, that just means it is not reading it properly. Is the NES faulty? No. This is normal.


9

This is due to a poor connection between the cartridge's contacts and the pin connectors. There are a few fixes for the problem: Use rubbing alcohol with a cotton swab on the cartridge's contacts. Try turning on the system without pushing the cart down into the NES. Just insert the cart so it connects into the slot, but leave the door open and don't push it ...


9

There's not a hardware device that would sit between a console and it's cartridge to record the game's state, and that's because it wouldn't be able to do this task. The cartridges hold the game's code, commonly burned into memory chips called ROMs. Cheat devices like the Game Genie or Action Replay sit between the console and these chips, and replace or ...


7

At 1:18 you can see him select the "Next" option in the menu to get to the next page. MetalMan's weapon is the second weapon on that page.


7

Forgive my bluntness but Agent86 is not entirely correct. Both the SNES and NES actually do have hardware devices that can save and restore state with off the shelf cartridges. As an added bonus both offer true slow motion capabilities (not the pause button hack commonly implemented by some controllers). These are perfect for games like Mortal Kombat and ...


6

Not only did word spread around, but a lot of media outlets showed kids blowing on the cartridge to make it work. Nintendo Power in particular would recommend it, as well as the official Nintendo Cleaning Kit, and it was well-known that dust was problematic. Like every other answer here though, I have to point out that re-inserting the cartridge was what ...


6

The constant cycle of blinking is a sign that you're having an issue with the 10NES lockout chip in the NES. This chip has to be able to connect to a similar chip in the cartridge or the NES resets itself every second. This causes the blinking of the little light and on the video out. It's normal to get this behavior with no cartridge in, but if it's ...


6

It probably happened to save money on the top screws. Looking around a bit, I've found the following text regarding the cartridge variations: Cartridges were originally released with five screws, one in each corner and one in the center. Later, the molds were changed so the back of the case held two male clips which hooked snuggly into the front’s “slot-B”...


5

A is used to jump. I most of the game A is used to jump. B is used to run. On the NES gamepad (and gamecube) the buttons A and B are reversed compared to the Xbox 360, Xbox One, and other conventional gamepad. Then in term of position in most of games you jump with the bottom left button, in Mario Bros you jump with the upper right button.


5

Taken directly from the Wikipedia page on the topic: When the trigger on the Zapper is pressed, the game causes the entire screen to become black for one frame. Then, on the next frame, all valid targets that are on screen are drawn all white as the rest of the screen remains black. The Zapper detects this change from low light to bright light, and ...


4

This link has it covered. Essentially, When you point at a duck and pull the trigger, the computer in the NES blacks out the screen and the Zapper diode begins reception. Then, the computer flashes a solid white block around the targets you’re supposed to be shooting at. The photodiode in the Zapper detects the change in light intensity and tells the ...


4

There was no answer in the game for how to solve this maze. This was confirmed by someone in 2009 who dumped all of the text from all of the transceiver messages just to try to answer this exact question. The original Metal Gear on the MSX didn't include these mazes and they seemed to be added to the NES version without any additional clues. However this ...


4

Typically, blowing into a NES gaming cartridge will make it work. If it didn't work before, maybe there was dust inside, so blowing is the best option.


4

Everyone had their own little "rain dance" to get the cartridge to work. I imagine none of them actually did anything. Eventually whatever condition prevented the cartridge from working would disappear and post hoc ergo propter hoc the rain dance worked!


4

The easy way to check the controller is to use Windows' built-in controller diagnostic screen. It can be tricky to find, at least on recent versions of Windows this procedure should work: Plug the controller into your Windows PC Open Control Panel Open Devices and Printers Right click on the controller's icon Select "Game controller settings" Make sure the ...


4

As a Famicom collector with 185 games, 51 Sufami games and a handful of Famicom disk games, I have never once doubted the validity of the games I am buying- because I've never thought of it (probably because I do all my buying in person and not online). Most counterfeit games I have seen are of the multi-cart style, where you might get 40 games in one, and ...


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