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32

The original SNES, while certainly one of the pinnacles of the 16-bit era, doesn't come without it's issues. You might find that original hardware will be harder to wrangle, especially 30 years later when we're talking about second-hand consoles in unknown states of disrepair, analog AV inputs disappearing off modern displays, and proper upscaling solutions ...


28

I read this question and instinctively agreed with Agent86's answer. But I decided to dust off my own SNES to do science and confirm his answer. The results were not exactly what I expected. I took out my North American SNES and my library of 13 games. All 13 (eventually) worked. I plugged in one of my controllers in the Player 2 port and tested them out. ...


18

At a guess, it's Terranigma. This is a picture of Terranigma from Wikipedia that appears to be the same area (the towers near the game's beginning):


14

Because those games are on the Wii Virtual Console, they require some kind of controller that the Wii (not the Wii U) knows about - the system is operating without access to any of the Wii U specific stuff when you're doing this. That means you need either a GameCube controller, or a Classic Controller attachment for a Wii Remote - and since a Wii U doesn't ...


13

There are a variety of computer cards called TV Tuner Cards, many of which include TV Capture functionality - older ones often have the Cable or Composite-In you'll require (this is how I played Majora's Mask the first time). TV Tuner/Capture Card (Red/White audio leads are meant to be combined and go through the 3.5mm jack). There are also apparently ...


12

Nintendo has two forms of revision numbers that they use for their cartridge games. The first one is the "-n" identifier on the end of the serial number which means that something physical about the cartridge has changed. In 99% of the cases this is an update to the label. Back in the mid-90's we saw a lot of "-1" games appear because common games that ...


11

Doubtful. "It's not yet in the shops, but we've 25 to give away this week..." source The peripheral was intended for release in October 1995 for £29.99, but was cancelled. –segaretro.org/Hyperscore This explains how you had one and why they don't work. I'd bet the independent seller wasn't supposed to be 'selling' you one. It would seem that ...


11

Let's sum up what we got. Possible reasons: Battery fault. SNES fault (for some reason erases saves randomly). Cartridge fault (memory chip corruption). So that's that you can do: Be sure you replaced battery nice and correctly. Try other games, and see if their saves are not lost. Try cartridge on some other SNES console and see if it fails there.


11

As I recall, most single player SNES games will only recognize a controller if it is plugged into the primary controller port. Without the ability to plug one in here, you won't be able to play most games.


11

There are a couple of tell-tale signs which actually seem common for just about all Nintendo, cartridge-based systems. Look for these qualities when attempting to identify counterfeit cartridges. Take a close look at the label. Is it blurry? It's probably a fake if it is. Most counterfeits use decent scans for reproduction labels, and the quality is more ...


8

Forgive my bluntness but Agent86 is not entirely correct. Both the SNES and NES actually do have hardware devices that can save and restore state with off the shelf cartridges. As an added bonus both offer true slow motion capabilities (not the pause button hack commonly implemented by some controllers). These are perfect for games like Mortal Kombat and ...


7

Virtualize the emulator! No, I'm not kidding - run a small Linux or Windows setup on a virtual machine fullscreened to one monitor and inside that run the emulator (it's only SNES after all). And since at least vmware player supports a dedicated USB mode where the host system won't even know about USB devices "attached" to the VM, you can even plug in a ...


6

I pulled out my old monitor to test the very small list of SNES emulators. zSNES uses DirectX calls that ignore Windows' own monitor logic, which requires that zSNES handles multiple monitors itself (which it doesn't). Without a rework of its rendering code (which has been promised and undelivered since 2006, at least), zSNES is out of the running. SNES9x ...


5

Unfortunately going from Composite to VGA is not a simple process. VGA has 3 channels (RGB), while composite has only one channel. To go from composite to VGA, you have to do this: Analog (Composite) => Digital => Digit processor to split the channels => Analog (VGA) Although cheap converters seem to be available (Amazon search for "composite to VGA"), ...


5

Taken from the FF Wiki: The original SNES version of Final Fantasy IV (Final Fantasy II in North America) and its PS1 ports contain a simple exploit that allows the player to duplicate any item that can be equipped in either hand. The player must make sure there is at least one blank space in the party's item inventory. The player must equip any ...


5

It takes a LOT to kill off a SNES, so I wouldn't give up on it until it's been tested thoroughly. If the red light goes on, it probably works. First of all, I wouldn't ever use coaxial/RF signal to hook up a SNES. First of all, that results in the worst possible image quality you can get, second of all there's a good chance you'll have problems making it ...


5

When the cartridges of the 16bit console generation were made, Flash memory which can contain data without being powered wasn't as affordable as it is today. Game cartridges which are able to store savegames used memory chips which required a continuous power supply by a battery to maintain their state while not plugged into a powered-on console. After all ...


5

Natively, yes you have options depending on your model SNES and TV. Your best bet is S-Video, as that is the most common plug available, but optimal is RGB but that isn't typically supported on modern TVs. The option you are using actually provides the worst image possible, but all of these will look bad on a HDTV, due to the way it upscales. Your better ...


4

Batteries are best stored at temperatures of 20°C / 68°F. More specifically, a battery provides more power at higher temperatures due to faster chemical reactions, which also speeds up self-discharge and reduces the battery's life. At low temperatures, the opposite happens, and the battery can actually hold its charge for longer. However, since chemical ...


4

The illustrator is Kugatsu Hime (九月姫).


4

Your note about the cup selection moving while inputting the code makes it sounds as though you are using left and right on the directional input (d-pad or analog stick). However, the code in question instead involves the use of the L and R buttons, located on the top of the controller. You should have no problem once you use those buttons to input the code ...


4

Super late answer, but I hope it helps someone at least. In order to emulate anything on higan you need to get the manifest.bml and the ipl.rom for whatever system you're emulating. You can find those in the git repository here Just stick those two files in your Super Famicom.sys folder and import your game using icarus. Then you should be good to go!


3

There's no cheap way of connecting an SNES to a VGA monitor. The SNES can output Composite video (the yellow cable, poor quality), S-Video (round cable with four pins, sharp image with a slight amount of color bleeding) and 15khz RGB (perfect quality). Unfortunately the RGB output can't be fed directly to a VGA monitor - these generally have a minimum ...


3

First, whatever you try, you might want to test it on a similar cartridge that does not have significance to you. That being said... For some cases, sharpie (or other permanent marker) on dry erase boards can be removed by marking over it with a dry erase marker, then erasing it. I have used this method countless times, and for anything but an extremely old ...


3

I'm not sure if you can apply it here, but I know there is a way to fix damaged paths on circuit board. Here is the link that demonstrates how to do it: In short, it describes how to remove the damaged section of a circuit trace, which tools to use and how to replace it with a new trace. In your case, I would first try to ...


3

I found I had to disable both triple buffering, and bilinear filtering. Either one of these options cut the speed in half.


3

I found the fix. When I disable triple buffering it works fine. Looks like a bug wither with Windows 8 compatibility, or with the new video card drivers.


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