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I my first playtrough Civ VI I've finished with cultural victory around year 2000 and to be honest it was a close one - I had to attack and conquer Russia, that was close to achieving it before me. While I don't remember my exact final score, in the leaders Hall of Fame I was at about 8-9th place.

In the second playtrough I've won around year 1920, again with cultural victory. This time my country was leading in all fields and (if I'd want to) I could achieve the domination victory many rounds earlier. Yet this time my score was much lower and in the Hall of Fame I've landed on 16th place.

Does it mean that longer game would always bring a higher score? It would be more logical if a quicker victory would rank you higher, not lower.

Both games were played on the same difficulty levels

To clarify: in example if I can achieve a victory in one round (i.e. only one city to conquer) but I'd instead wait few more rounds gathering culture, science etc, before conquering the final city, will my score be lower or higher?

  • I don't really think this question has a purpose. Everyone plays differently and can achieve different scores in different times. Someone who's mastered the min/max would be able to hit your score 50 turns earlier maybe. Every game is different, and while a longer game time tends to mean higher score, there's no special formula. – n_plum Feb 4 '18 at 21:25
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    @n_palum Except for how score is literally decided by a formula. – Studoku Feb 4 '18 at 21:33
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    It's decided by a formula, but time isn't a factor in it. They're asking does more time mean more score or vice versa. – n_plum Feb 4 '18 at 21:34
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    @n_palum it is: Lets say that to get a victory I need to conquer one more city and I can do it in one turn. If I'd wait 5 more turns doing nothing, but gathering culture, science (maybe getting a new discovery) and THEN I'll conquer the city, will my score be higher or lower? – Yasskier Feb 4 '18 at 22:54
  • It is all dependent on the factors that provide you score. Like I said, there are people who can get a higher score quicker simply through being more efficient. – n_plum Feb 4 '18 at 23:04
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Yes, at least indirectly.

Score is derived from a variety of factors, including number of cities, number of technologies, population, and wonders built. Many of these factors are things that you can and often will do more of if you are given more turns.

However, unlike some earlier Civ games, there is no score bonus for winning or ending the game early. This means that the longer you play without actually winning, the more chance you have to earn points and the higher your score will be.

If your goal is getting the highest score possible, you should subjugate your opponents, then spend as many turns as possible building an empire without winning.

  • As an addendum there is also no score bonus for higher difficulties like in previous games, which means, if you want to maximize score, you are better off playing on settler difficulty. For comparison, in Civ4 given the exact same game end, your final score would be five times as high on deity than on settler. – Dulkan Feb 5 '18 at 13:58

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